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Full text of "California Garden, Vol. 60, No.5, October-November 1969"

Galifbrnia. 



OCTOBER -NOVEMBER 



1969 



50 cents 



GARDEN 







Iceland poppies 




CALIFORNIA'S OWN GARDEN MAG AZI NE... PUBLISHED SINCE 1909 



Floral events 



Shows in Conference Building, Balboa Park unless listed otherwise. 

SAN DIEGO FLORAL ASSOCIATION PROGRAMS— Tuesday No- 
vember 18, 1:00 p.m. Program will be presented by Finn's Candle 
Shop. The use of candles for the holidays will be stressed. Flower 
arrangements using candles will be featured through the courtesy of 
the Southwestern Judges Council. 

Tuesday, December 16 — 6:00 p.m. Pot luck and song, watch the 
newsletter for food schedule. 

FLOWER SHOW SCHOOL Course 4 PALOMAR DISTRICT San 
Diego Floral Building Registration 8:45, October 28-29, lectures 
at 9:00 a.m. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, HORTICULTURE LECTURE by Mrs. 
Iva Newman, Hillsborough, California. Subject: gerberas, roses, 
bromeliads and bonsai. Lecture $5.00. Floral Building, 9 a.m. 

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 29— FLOWER ARRANGING LECTURE 
& point scoring. Lecture by Mrs. Maude Schildmacher, Tucson, 
Arizona. Modern Expressive Design and Table Settings. Lecture 
$5.00. Lunch Daily $1.25. Floral Building, 9 a.m. 

SAN DIEGO-IMPERIAL COUNTIES IRIS SOCIETY— Fall Show 
November 16, 1969, 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Floral Building. 

BOTANICAL OPEN HOUSE— San Diego Botanical Garden Founda- 
tion, Inc. Floral Building, Balboa Park. 
November 2, 1969 — Grossmont Garden Club 

November 23, 1969 — An Econ-Botany Demonstration with Helen 
Witham. 
November 30, 1969 — North County Shade Plant Club 

CHULA VISTA GARDEN CLUB— 29th Annual Holiday Show and 
Sale, Rohr Park Manor, 4548 Sweetwater Road, Bonita, Calif. Free. 
Wednesday, November 19, 11:00 a.m. to 3 p.m. Luncheon (nomi- 
nal cost). 

CROWN GARDEN CLUB OF CORONADO — 10th ANNUAL 
FALL SHOW — "Fiesta de las Flores" — Salute to the 200th Birth- 
day. Coronado Woman's Clubhouse on Silver Strand November 8th 
3-7 p.m. Saturday. November 9th 10:30 a.m. — 4:30 p.m. Sunday. 

SAN DIEGO FLORAL PROGRAM CHAIRMAN 
MRS. ALVIN T. LAUGHLIN 



Bus Tours 



AUTUMN LEAVES TOUR— Friday, November 28 and Saturday 29. A 
"Soul" tour through the San Diego back country, through Cleveland 
National Forest with its black trunk trees laden with golden leaves. Stops 
at local products stores in Julian, a visit to Palomar Observatory. If it 
it not too late, the group will visit a family wine tasting room returning. 
Buses will load in La Jolla at 8:30 and Balboa Park at 9:00 a.m. and will 
return about 6:00 p.m. Cost of the tour, $6.50. 

ENSENADA SHOPPING TOUR— Saturday, December 6. We will repeat 
the November tour (if there is a demand). 

RESERVATIONS may be made by sending check or money 
order to the San Diego Floral Association one week before the 
tour. Office hours are Monday, Wednesday and Friday between 
10 and 3, telephone 232-5762. Mrs. Donald A. Innis and Mrs. 
Walter Bunker will also give information. 




EXQUISITE 

BLOOMING PLANTS AT 

GARDEN CENTER 
454-424 1 

7555 EADS AVENUE • LA JOLLA 



WATER LILIES 

FREE CATALOGUE 

Pool Building & Planting Instructions 
VAN NESS WATER GARDENS 
Closed Sundays and Mondays 

2460 North Euclid Avenue 
UPLAND, CALIFORNIA 91786 



Readers! Gardeners! 

USE OUR CLASSIFIED ADS 

Send your ad in NOW to Editor Vir- 
ginia IMorell, 9173 Overton Avenue, 
San Diego, California 92123. Mini- 
mum charge, $1.00 per line (or ap- 
proximately seven words per line). 
Please send remittance with your 
copy by November 20 for the De- 
cember-January issue. 

Classified Ads Cost Little 
and Bring Great Returns 



SAN DIEGO FLORAL ASSOCIATION PROGRAMS — Third Tuesday, Floral Building, Balboa Park — Chairman, Mrs. Alvin T. Laughlin 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 







San Diego's Oldest 
and Largest Garden Club 

Floral Building, 

Balboa Park 

232-5762 



Founded 1907 — Incorporated 1910 



OFFICERS 

President 

Mrs. Donald A. Innis 

Vice-President 

Mrs. A. T. Laughlin 

2nd Vice-President 

Mrs. Walter Bunker 

Treasurer 

Dr. George W. Bremner 

Corresponding Secretary 

Mrs. Jose Garcia 

Recording Secretary 

Mrs. O. M. Conoley 
DIRECTORS 

Term 1967-1970 

Capt. Charles Spiegel 
Mrs. Eugene Whigham 

Term 1968-1971 

Mrs. Roland Hoyt 

Mrs. Hans Mattenklodt 

Term 1969-1972 

Mrs. Eugene Cooper 
Mrs. Paul Witham 

PARLIAMENTARIAN 

Mrs. Eugene Daney 

HONORARY LIFE MEMBERS 

Mrs. Anne Robinson Tedford 
Mr. Chauncy I. Jerabek 
Mrs. Alice Mary Clark 
Miss Alice Mary Rainford 
Mrs. Roland Hoyt 
Miss Ada Perry 

EDITOR EMERITUS 

Mrs. Alice Mary Clark 

PUBLISHERS 

of 

CALIFORNIA GARDEN MAGAZINE 

SINCE 1909 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 

California's Own Garden Magazine 
October - November, 1969 



Vol. 60 



No. 5 



THE COVER 

Mrs. Eugene Cooper had her camera out again at just the right moment and 
caught the fragile beauty of a bed of Iceland Poppies. See our article about these 
plants on page 5. 

FEATURES 

Iceland Poppies by Lucille Delgado - - 5 

Plant Roses in the Fall _ 7 

Book Reviews - - 8 

Corsages by Carolyn J. Buman - 9 

Torrey Pines Extension Campaign by Arthur Matula - — 12 

New Cultural Building Groundbreaking by Joan Betts ... 15 

Proteas: A Visit with Howard Asper by Virginia Norell — 17 

Rose Petal Cookies, a Recipe - 22 

Historical Reprints: The Lath House, 1910 24 

Girl Scouts Learn Gardening by Donna Greenlaw 25 

Succulents of the Season - - - 26 

Calendar of Care 

Plants and Their Environment by George James - 28 

Dahlias by Larry Sisk -30 

Fuchsias by Morrison W . Doty ... -31 

Roses by Richard D. Streeper --32 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 

Published Bi-Monthly by the SAN DIEGO FLORAL ASSOCIATION 
Floral Association Building, Balboa Park, San Diego, California 92101 

232-5762 

Publication Board 

Virgil Schade, President; Mrs. W. E. Betts, Jr.; Mrs. Eugene Cooper; Mrs. Donald A. Innis; 

Mrs. William Mackintosh; Mrs. John Marx; and Mrs. Paul Witham 

Editor: Virginia Casty Norell 

Editorial Office: 9173 Overton Avenue 

San Diego, California 92123 

Phone: 277-8893 

Advertising 

Contact Mrs. Virginia Norell, 277-8893 
9173 Overton Avenue, San Diego, 
California 92123 
Advertising rates on request. Copy deadline, 1st day of the month preceding date of issue. 
California Garden is on the list of publications authorized by the San Diego Retail Merchants Associa- 
tion. Entered as second-class matter, Dec. 8, 1910 at the Post Office at San Diego, California under the 
Act of March 3 1879. 

© October 1969, San Diego Floral Association. Printed in U.S.A. "We reserve the right to grant per- 
mission for quotation." Write to Editor at address shown above. 



Staff Photographer: 

Betty Mackintosh 



POSTMASTER: SEND FORM 3579 TO: 

CALIFORNIA GARDEN MAGAZINE 

FLORAL BUILDING, BALBOA PARK, SAN DIEGO, CA. 92101 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



You are invited to 
become a member of 



J he J5an <UJieao 
^7 tonal ^4l 



teocLation 



Membership includes: 

• Monthly meetings featuring 
outstanding speakers 

• A monthly Sunday afternoon 
garden tour 

• Subscription to CALIFORNIA 
GARDEN bi-monthly 

• Use of a large horticultural 
library 

Fill in box with membership desired and 

mail with check to 

San Diego Floral Association 
Balboa Park, San Diego, Calif. 92101 

Classification of Memberships: 

Individual $ 5.00 □ 

Family $ 5.50 □ 

Sustaining $10.00 □ 

Contributing $25.00 □ 

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Address . 

Zip _ . 



WHEN YOU MOVE 

Send new and old address 

plus zip code to 

CALIFORNIA GARDEN 
Balboa Park, San Diego, Calif. 92101 



GREEN THUMB CALENDAR 

GARDENING 

MONTH-BY-MONTH 

IN SAN DIEGO 

Revised Edition, 1967, with Official 
Plant-Flower-Tree Guide for 200th 
Anniversary Floral Comm. 1969 Cele- 
bration. 

For Your Gardening Pleasure and 
Gifts for Friends, 
Mail $1.10 Each 

to 

S. D. SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA ASSN. OFFICE 

P. O. Box 3175, S. D. 92103 

All Proceeds Benefit 
Childrens & Youth Concerts 



MISSION HILLS NURSERY 

BULBS AND CYCLAMEN 
COMPLETE SELECTION OF INTERIOR TROPICAL HOUSEPLANTS 



Since 1924 We Give S&H Green Stamps 

1525 Fort Stockton Drive 



Phone 295-2808 
San Diego 92103 



CURTIS COLEMAN CO. REALTORS 

SINCE 1913 

SALES LEASES REAL ESTATE LOANS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

Suite 2100, United States National Bank Bldg. 
Centre City, San Diego 1, Calif. 233-6557 



LEARN TO ENJOY YOUR 
CALIFORNIA GARDEN 

MORE 

by reading the California experts who share their ex- 
perience and know-how with you, through the pages of 

CALIFORNIA GARDEN MAGAZINE 

written by and for Californians and published since 
1909 by the San Diego Floral Association. 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE 



1 Year, $2.50 
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL - 3 SUBSCRIPTIONS, $5.99 

Use this handy form to mail your subscription now! Send it to: Floral 
Building, Balboa Park, San Diego, California 92101. 

A Subscription to California Garden Makes a Wonderful Gift. 



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Please find enclosed payment for 1 year, $2.50 



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The San Diego Floral Association, it carries with it a one-year 
subscription to California Garden Magazine. 

(Check here if you wish a membership: [ ]) 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 




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iiii-" 1 



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ill 

Photos by Mackintosh 

320 Moss Avenue 

422-4650 Chula Vista 






^^SmSSm^mmMm 




CALIFORNIA GARDEN 

CLASSIFIED ADS 

(See Page 8) 



ICELAND POPPY 

(Papaver Nudicaule) 

by Lucille Delgado 



In recent years several grand strains of 
the Iceland Poppy have been raised. The 
flowers show a wider range of coloring 
than the older kinds and the stems are 
longer. They make showy groups in the 
garden and are ideal flowers for cutting 
for decorative use indoors. 

The Iceland Poppy derives its name 
from its prevalence in the Arctic regions 
where it thrives. Papaver Nudicaule is 
the name given to the Iceland Poppy and 
refers to the lack of leaves on the scape, 
which distinguishes this and the Alpine 
Poppy from the common corn poppy. 

For all its flimsy texture the poppy has 
flickered through human history like a 
little flame. Like the flame that warms 
and burns, it runs to extremes. Unlike its 
brother, the opium poppy, Nudicaule has 
brought happiness to man only through 
contemplation of its beauty. Its satiny, 
crimpled, parchment-like petals reach up 
from ten to twenty inches on long, leaf- 
less stems from mounds of gray-green 
lobed leaves which cluster just above the 
ground. Its petals form a delicate cup 
which is approximately three inches 
across. 

This short-lived perennial, commonly 
treated as an annual, comes in a wide 
range of most delicate colors; cream, buff, 
pink, apricot, salmon and coral red, as 
well as the more usual colors of yellow, 
deep orange and white. Although it is 
the glory of the Arctic Regions and ranges 
over immense territory, the Iceland Poppy 
enjoys a good deal of popularity in Cali- 
fornia along with the Oriental Poppy. 
However, it is short-lived here, not be- 
cause they winterkill as they do back east 
but because they dislike our long, dry and 
warm summers. 

If treated as biennials, sowing the seed 
in early autumn, in California, in flats or 
seed beds under lath with only a sprink- 
ling of sand over them, they will do well 
in this climate and provide beautiful bou- 
quets for your home. Cut them in the 
bud early in the morning for best results. 

Seeds may also be sown out-of-doors 
in May and June in a spare border where 
the soil has been broken down finely with 
fork or rake; it is necessary to do this be- 



cause the seeds are very small. They are 
sown in drills half and inch or so deep 
and ten inches apart. It is wise to sow 
the seeds thinly because seedlings should 
be left undisturbed until autumn when 
they are planted out where they are to 
remain and bloom the following year. If 
crowded in places the seedlings must be 
thinned out. They can, if necessary, be 
transplanted though it may be wiser not 
to disturb them, for they make better 
progress and develop into finer plants if 
not moved before autumn. 

An alternate method is to sow seeds 
in small pots in a frame and grow the 
seedlings in these after thinning them out 
to one to each pot. Plant them where they 
are to flower before they become root- 
bound. In transplanting, unlike most 
poppies, they readily adapt to the change 
and can be pricked out about two inches 
apart before final planting, or if condi- 
tions are very favorable, they can go di- 
rectly into their flowering places. Give 
them sun and sandy soil in which they 
will flourish rather than in heavier ones. 
When using fertilizer, avoid those with 
much nitrogen as an excess will alter the 
quality and texture of the plant. 

Good results are obtained if plants are 
spaced six inches or a foot apart for nice 
beds or border patches. Early autumn 
sowings will give flowers in spring when 
moisture conditions are best for them and 
chewing insects have not yet appeared 
to deface the flowers. Young plants may 
be covered with screen to protect from 
the birds. Depending upon the strain, 
the fully-matured plant will have up to 
fifty blooms produced upon it. Pick flow- 
ers frequently. 

The Iceland Poppy will bloom lux- 
uriantly the year following sowing and 
will then die out with only a straggler or 
two coming up the following year. It is 
best to replant completely after most of 
the plants die out. 

Commercially, seed beds are sterilized 
with live steam but the same results may 
be had by placing a pot of earth in the 
oven for twenty minutes. If chemicals are 
used, at least two weeks is required for 

Continued, page 54 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



Retired? 
Why Not Relax, Too? 




Garden at Monte Vista Lodge, San Diego's full-service retirement residence. 



H 



ere's the place to relax; to fully enjoy your retirement. Your own private, 
ground-level apartment with maid service. Three meals daily, selecting your 
favorites from a variety of menus. Special diets as needed. Your own kitchenette 
for snacks. Scheduled transportation downtown each day, plus frequent recrea- 
tional trips. Complete infirmary with nurses on duty 'round-the-clock. Audi- 
torium, library, TV center, beauty shop. Heated swimming pool, shuffleboard, 
and other recreational facilities. Personal laundry service. And more. 

NO ENTRANCE FEE, NO CAPITAL INVESTMENT. Come for a few months 
or stay for a lifetime; the choice is yours. Pay only the first and last months' rent. 

PLAN NOW TO VISIT US. We're just a few blocks south of Highway 94 . . . 
only minutes from downtown San Diego. Phone or write Robert Beasley, Director, 
and let us know when you're coming; or ask for additional information, and we'll 
send it by return mail. We look forward to hearing from you. 




MONTE VISTA RETIREMENT LODGE 

Telephone (714) 465-1331 
2211 Massachusetts Avenue • Lemon Grove, California 92045 



"THE ROSE SHOW 

Rows of beautiful roses, 
Each in a crystal vase, 
Waiting for the fudges 
To scan each blooming face. 

Some will rate a blue ribbon 
Others will get a red, 
And here and there a yellow or white 
Will grace a lovely head. 

So it is, with each of us — 

Each must stand alone. 

To be fudged by God and our fellow men 

By the deeds that we have done. 

We cannot all be winners — 
We can only do our parts. 
Striving toward perfection 
With hope and love in our hearts. 

— Mrs. Her ma Ferguson 



758 

Hillside Drive 

Overlooking La Jolla Shores, just 
up the hill -from Torrey Pines Road, or 
down the hill from Mt. Soledad, is 
HILLSIDE NURSERY. Whichever ap- 
proach you take, you'll find a WON- 
DERLAND OF PLANTS — rare Be- 
gonias, Philodendrons, Tropicals, fine 
House Plants — a wide variety of well 
grown nursery stock. 

Corey Hogewoning, Prop. 



Amtomelli Brothers 

TUBEROUS BEGONIAS 

2545 Capitola Road 
Santa Cruz, California 95062 

36-page co/or catalog 25 cents 




Alice and Allan Zukor 
Validated Customer Parking at Rear of Store 

733 Broadway 239-I228 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



Plant Roses in the Fall 



. . . its 



easy 



— from the Fall 

Rose News, All 

America Rose 

Selections 



All-America Rose Selections, noted as 
a highly experienced group of hybridizers, 
growers and introducers of fine roses, 
have long urged gardeners throughout 
the temperate regions to plant roses in the 
fall. From their own 24 years of growing 
experience and their unequaled testing 
facilities spread throughout the country, 
the members of AARS long ago learned 
the advantages of fall planting in all but 
the more northern areas of the United 
States. 

Although rose plants make little or no 
growth in the fall after they are planted, 
the ground settles firmly about the roots 
during the winter and the plants are es- 
tablished and ready to start active growth 




Prepare and fertilize bed. Dig hole 
15" to 18" wide and as deep. Add 
quart of peat moss mixed with y 2 
cup of fertilizer. Mix well with 
soil. Form a mound in center and 
position rose on mound. 




Fill remainder of hole with water 
and allow to drain. See that the 
bud union remains at ground level. 



with the event of warm weather, long 
before most spring roses are purchased 
and planted. 

Planting roses in the fall is a very easy 
procedure. Simply carry out the few 
fundamental practices shown in the ac- 
companying diagrams. 

After you have your location chosen 
and the ground prepared, get your roses, 
prune all canes back to 18 inches, trim 
any damaged roots and plant as soon as 
possible. For roses that will give satis- 
factory and outstanding performance, 
choose the All-America award winners, 
all of which bear the emblem on a green 
and white identification tag attached to 
each plant. 







-4 




ML 


It ^/■VvC 


tfirlfe? 






jfti p**~^ 


*^5\\a 




tHI^M v. 


^^^▼9 





See that roots are spread out natu- 
rally and that bud union (swelling 
at base of stems) is level with 
ground. Scatter several inches loose 
soil over roots and firm well with 
foot. 




Fill remainder of hole with soil and 
tamp. The plant is now ready for 
the mound of soil which will pro- 
tect it against rapid freezing and 
thawing during the winter. 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



BILL'S CAMERA REPAIR 

Our 20th Year 
5 SKILLED TECHNICIANS 

— WE SERVICE — 

CAMERAS - PROJECTORS 

LIGHT METERS 

Factory Warranty Service 

For 

Bell & Howell, Kodak 

Graflcx 

3951 GOLDFINCH ST. 

(AT WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.) 
SAN DIEGO. CALIF. 92103 

298-8657 

(Closed Saturdays) 



Book Reviews 



1323311 



Soluble PLANT FOOD Complete 



GROWS BETTER PLANTS INDOORS OR OUTDOORS llriiillTp fl 
In Poorest Soil -- Even in Sand or Water 

Preferred by millions for 30 years. Simply dissolve 
in water and feed all plants through roots or foliage. 
Clean, odorless. If dealer can't supply, send $1 for 
10 ozs. - makes 60 gals. 75-Pioduct Catalog free. 



HYDROPONIC CHEM. CO., Copley, Ohio 44321, U.S.A. 




CALIFORNIA GARDEN 

CLASSIFIED ADS 



SEDUMS & SEMPERVIVUMS 

OVER 170 Hardy Named varieties, Pink, Reu, 
through Purple, Blue and Green. 10 for $3.35 
Postpaid. Oakhill Gardens, Route 3, Box 87K, 
Dallas, Oregon 97338. 



RHAPSODIE AFRICAN VIOLETS 

New RHAPSODIE Violets, three different $5.00 
postpaid. One year old plants have 300 to 400 
blooms which won't drop. Vigorous, speedy 
growth and disease resistant. Begonia or geran- 
ium list on request. 

FLORA GREENHOUSES 

BOX 1191 
BURLINGAME, CALIFORNIA 94010 



Readers! Gardeners! 

Send your ad in NOW to Editor Vir- 
ginia Norell, 9173 Overton Avenue, 
San Diego, California 92123. Mini- 
mum charge, $1.00 per line (or ap- 
proximately seven words per line). 
Please send remittance with your 
copy by November 10 tor the De- 
cember-January issue. 

Classified Ads Cost Little 
and Bring Great Returns 



Interpretive Flower Arrangement, by 
Nelda H. Brandenburger. Hearth- 
side Press, Inc., New York, 1969; 
157 pages, 98 illustrations (eight re- 
peated in color), $6.95. 

Mrs. Brandenburger, a Nationally Ac- 
credited Flower Show Judge and member 
of the Sacramento Arrangers Guild, has 
written a satisfying book for sophisticated 
arrangers who plan interpretive expressive 
work. 

Contents include: Part I, Design Ele- 
ments for Arranger and Exhibitor; Part 
II, Interpreting the Arts; Part III, Im- 
pressions of the World — Seen and Un- 
seen. There are helpful hints for those 
who write flower show schedules and 
some words for judges who are urged to 
keep alert to new trends in flower ar- 
rangement and attuned to the exhibitor's 
ideas. 

We are taught how to communicate 
what we feel — emotions, impressions, 
sensations — through the sensitive use of 
the elements of design. An upright line 
suggests strength and a drooping line, 
despair; red means danger and black, 
mourning to all of us. Opening our eyes 
to the value of texture in telling a story, 
the author lists 34 plants with suitable 
adjectives, from the obvious "soft" pe- 
tunia and "velvety" rose to "warty" 
gourds. 

The author's creations interpret Haiku 
(Japanese poems about the simple things 
of nature), Ballet, Music, Sculpture, Sea- 
sons and Times and many Moods, Emo- 
tions and Feelings. You will find proof 
that interpretive abstract arrangements are 
often beautiful and always more creative 
than arrangements made purely for decor- 
ative effect. While those illustrated bear 
little resemblance to the work of tradi- 
tional arrangers all adhere to accepted 
design principle. 

We predict that Mrs. Brandenburger's 
imaginative art and her careful notes on 
construction will stimulate each reader 
to try his own hand at interpretive 
creativity. 

— Dorothy Marx 
La Jolla, California 



Irises, by Harry Randall. Eight full- 
page color photos, fifty photographs, 
numerous line drawings. One hun- 
dred seventy-six pages. Printed - 
1969 in Great Britain. Available 



from Taplinger Publishing Com- 
pany, 29 East Tenth Street, New 
York, N. Y. 10003. $8.95 

This book has been written for the use 
of amateur iris growers. White it con- 
tains sections on Siberian, Pacific Coast, 
Louisiana, and spuria irises, the main 
emphasis of the book is on bearded irises, 
particularly tall beardeds. 

The author, a noted English gardener 
and a leading figure in the British Iris 
Society, died prior to publication, so copy- 
right is held by the widow. The preface 
indicates that the manuscript was not 
completed when the author died — and 
that incompleted portions were filled in 
by wife, daughter, and friends. It is 
credit to these friends that they have ad- 
hered to the writing style of Randall so 
faithfully that no discontinuities and no 
patchwork spots are apparent. Regret- 
tably, however, the friends did not do a 
thorough job of proofreading before 
publication. As a result, errata slips are 
entered to correct three statistical errors 
and to correct two transposed photo cap- 
tions; some other minor errors remain 
uncorrected. 

The most candid and outspoken chap- 
ter in the book is that titled "What Con- 
stitutes a Good Iris?" In it, Randall with- 
out equivocation prescribes essential re- 
quirements of a good iris — to the 
detriment of many irises which have been 
represented as being good — but are not. 

Randall designates and describes the 
one hundred irises which he most highly 
recommends. In making his selections he 
has used wonderfully astute judgment; 
his list almost surely is more perceptive 
than the annual award list or the "pop- 
ularity poll" or "judges choice" lists of 
the American Iris Society. 

Although Randall is an Englishman, 
very few irises of English hybridizers ap- 
pear on his list. Although he grew many 
of the very latest introductions, he em- 
phatically does not suffer from the com- 
mon inclination to equate newness and/ 
or price with quality; only half of his 
favorite irises were introduced during the 
last eight years. He explains the basis for 
his judgments. But he himself empha- 
sizes that his selections are based on per- 
formance in "the peculiar mixture of 
weather which we are pleased to call the 
British climate." He acknowledges that 

Continued page 1 1 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



T 



HERE ARE MANY WAYS of making 

a corsage. To learn, try to find someone 
who knows how to teach you, and if you 
can't do that, go to the library and check 
out a book on corsages. Whenever you 
receive a corsage or see one, look it over 
carefully to see how it is constructed and 
if possible, when it is wilted take it apart. 

Making a corsage is relatively simple. 
Once you learn how to wire, tape and tie 
a bow, all that is left is putting all the 
elements together. Cut, wire and tape 
your net, ribbon loops and the accessories 
that need it, then prepare your flowers. 

Your flowers should have been in water 
at least an hour or longer between cut- 
ting from the plant and using. This 
gives the flowers time to drink their fill 
of water so as to retain their substance 
while wearing. With your flowers hard- 
ened off, you are ready to put your cor- 
sage together. Leave about one half inch 
of stem only, on all flowers, any more 
than that will make your corsage too 
bulky and will probably break off any- 
way. Next, wire your flowers. Put the 
wire through the center of the calyx on 
roses, carnations, daisies, iris and most 
buds; make a hairpin and put down 
through the center of chrysanthemums, 
dahlias, and stephanotis; and through the 
top of the stem on orchids. Fold the wire 
down in half, making a hairpin out of it 
for all flowers. (Don't wind the two 
strands of wire around each other, ever.) 
Next, tape the flower. If you are adding 
net to each flower, do it at this time be- 
fore putting the whole corsage together. 

Then put all the elements of the cor- 
sage together. Start with your smaller 
flowers first and as you add each item, 
tape it to the previous stem. Stagger the 
flowers so that no two are directly across 
from each other at the top part of your 
corsage. It is permissible for them to be 
across from each other near the base of 
the corsage. After you have the ma- 
jority of the flowers in the corsage you 
add the bow and the last couple of 
flowers. 

The bow loops should be just big 
enough to show above the flowers, not 
overpower them. After all the flowers, 
net, ribbon and accessories are in the cor- 
sage, tape the remaining wire and cover 
with ribbon. Covering with ribbon is not 
necessary, but it gives a nice finishing 
touch. Wind the covered wire around a 
pencil to give it a curl and the wire can't 
be seen when worn. 



PHOTOS 

BY 

BETTY 

MACKINTOSH 



Corsages of dried 

materials. Upper, 

sections of the 

cottonseed pod, 

reversed. The other 

contains balls from 

the sycamore tree 

and seed pods 

from one of 

the acacias. 



Below: fresh flower 

corsage of dainty 

pink Duet 




Co r sages 



by Carolyn J. Buman 



When you are all through putting the 
corsage together check the placement of 
all the flowers, ribbon and accessories 
and make sure you have the effect you 
want. Next spray the flowers with a very 
fine spray of water, being careful to shake 
off the excess water on everything but 
the flowers. Store the corsage then in a 
plastic bag or box in the refrigerator for 
at least an hour if not longer. Take the 
corsage out of the refrigerator, shake off 
any excess water, put it on and wear it 
with pride. 

The finished product should be pleas- 
ing to the eye. Just about any combina- 
tion of flowers, colors or accessories is ac- 
ceptable as long as it isn't gaudy or in 
questionable taste. 

Always remember when wearing a cor- 
sage, the flowers are worn the way they 




. ; ■.>;*":"' 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



■■ 





















f 




***** 








A 

chart of 

corsage 

materials, 

prepared 

by 

Mrs. Bum an 



wt*ii«-<V* £V4tS 



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wtrtrv rc4£S 



fl&T W? Taxtf * Aat^ ^6U*S 




( jrt'jrr < rw^cr 



£mu7im Of A C0ft$A6£ 





rlcffifAPjr *<-9*y cc-sf? 








*/*£. £T*M3 T4 ARJl 



grow. Flowers generally grow up so 
wear them that way. As a general rule 
the bow and the wire end of the corsage 
is worn at the bottom. About 85 per 
cent of the people who wear corsages 
wear them upside down. Do you? 

Mechanics count in making corsages. 
Poor mechanics, like not covering all 
your wire, blunt ends on ribbon and leav- 
ing holes reminds one of a nice-looking 
woman with her slip showing or her hem 
torn. Make sure everything is covered 
that should be. Don't leave gaping holes 
or spaces in your corsage and make sure 
ribbon ends are cut on the diagonal. 

The supplies used in a corsage are 
numerous. First and foremost are the 



flowers you use. These can be fresh, dry 
or artificial such as plastic or ribbon. 
Wire comes in many gauges. Numbers 28 
and 26 are the most popular. The higher 
the gauge in number, the thinner the wire. 
Number 30 is a very light wire and No. 
16 a very heavy wire. These are used for 
single flower stems in arrangements. Wire 
comes in eighteen inch lengths, but you 
don't generally use that length unless you 
are making a wedding bouquet. Nor- 
mally, you cut the wire in half or in 
thirds, giving you nine and six inch 
lengths. You use the nine-inch wire for 
most flowers and ribbon loops and the 
six-inch wire for bows and net. 

Floratape comes next. This comes in 



a wide variety of colors and about six 
shades of green. Green and white are 
the most popular in use. Try to use the 
color tape that will complement the 
flowers you are using. The tape will ad- 
here to itself and either side can be used. 

Most all corsages use ribbon. Ribbon 
comes in all colors imaginable, even varie- 
gated. The standard sizes used are No. 3 
(%") and No. 2 (%"). Narrower or 
wider ribbons are used, but not as often. 
An average bow takes approximately one 
yard of ribbon to make. 

Netting comes in just about any color, 
also silver and gold with different colors. 
There are two types of netting. Tulle is 
preferred, and has quite small holes or 
openings in the thread (1/32" - 2/32"). 
Net has large holes or opening in the 
thread ( 3/3 2" - 4/32") . The netting is 
cut and wired in various shapes for use 
in the corsage. (See illustration.) 

Corsage pins are as important as every- 
thing else for they are what holds the 
corsage to the wearer. The heads of the 
pins come in many colors in pearlized, 
metallics and opaques in round and tear- 
drop shapes. Use two pins to each cor- 
sage to make sure the corsage will stay on. 

There is a large range of accessories 
that can be used. Colored satin, metallic 
and velvet leaves, balls, bells, pine cones, 
rhinestones, pearls, feathers, natural foli- 
age and just about anything else one can 
think of to use. Save the accessories from 
old corsages and use them over. It saves 
you money and nobody can tell the dif- 
ference. 

In using natural foliage, be sure that 
what you use will not wilt. Never use 
rose foliage because within an hour or 
two it will be very limp and start to curl. 
A good way to determine what you can 
and can't use, is cut a piece of the foliage 
you want to use and let it lay for several 
hours or overnight out of water. If it 
stands up, use it, if it doesn't, don't. 
Foliages such as Texas Privet, raphiolepis, 
leather fern and ivy are all very good 
to use. Always keep in mind though that 
the foliage must be mature. Never use 
tender new foliage as it just won't stand 
up. 

Most all of the supplies that you need 
can be purchased in a hobby store, but 
they will be on the expensive side. If 
possible go to a retail supply house such 
as Swopes or Dave's Display World in 
San Diego. 

You may have to purchase items in a 



10 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



Christmas corsages of 

small cones, ornaments, 

metallic leaves and ribbons. 



little bit larger quantity than you wanted, 
but if you make many corsages, it will pay 
you to do so. Maybe two or three people 
can get together and split the amount that 
comes in a package or roll, thereby achiev- 
ing a very reasonable cost. For instance, 
No. 3 ribbon purchased by the yard may 
cost you five to ten cents per yard and by 
the 100-yard roll may cost you $1.50, a 
considerable savings. 

Remember that because you purchased 
something to use in a corsage doesn't 
mean you can't use it on something else, 
such as a gift. Corsage ribbon makes ex- 
cellent ribbon for wrapping packages and 
is less expensive than regular gift ribbon. 

Make a few corsages for fun and prac- 
tice. You'll pick up the fine points of cor- 
sage making automatically and just might 
add some creative cleverness of your own. 
The final product will certainly be worth 
the effort. B 








■ ■ : 



will! 






.■■■ 

11 

■■ ■■■■ : ■ ' ■■, 




Book Reviews 



Continued 



other irises might be better performers in 
warmer and drier climates. (For exam- 
ple, Tom Craig's varieties perform beau- 
tifully in southern California's climate — 
but not so beautifully in England.) 

Randall evaluates the contributions of 
deceased iris hybridizers with candor and 
fine objectivity — but he abides by a self- 
imposed rule under which he declines 
to comment about any living person. Now 
that he himself is deceased, his own work 
can be evaluated under his own standards. 
By those standards — or any other stand- 
ards — it merits a rating of excellent. 

— Bill Gunther 



Using Wayside Plants: 

Nelson Coon } Hearth side Press 1969 

California's wayside plants are so dif- 
ferent from those of the Northeastern 
part of the United States, the area cov- 
ered by the book, that we can only say 
that it is interesting to read but not of 
much practical value to us. And interest- 
ing it is: the first half deals with usage 
of uncultivated plants as foods, dyes, 
medicinal drugs, material for crafts and 
games for children, and landscaping; with 
directions for making such things as bay- 
berry candles, maple sugar, and sassafras 
tea. 

In the second half the 100 plants 
whose uses have been detailed in the first 
section are described and illustrated. In- 



cluded with the descriptive material in 
each case is a small map indicating dis- 
tribution by states, to let the reader know 
where he may expect to find the plants. 
A handy book to have along with you 
if you are driving in that part of the 
country, especially if you are on less 
traveled roads where you can jog along 
at your own speed and look at wayside 
plants. 

— H.V.W. 



Book Reviewers Welcome! 

Please share knowledge of gardening 
books, new or old, with your gardening 
friends. The editor will be glad to re- 
ceive any book reviews. 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



11 




This article is 
dedicated to the 
preservation of 
one of San Diego's 
last remaining open 
beauty spots — 
Torrey Pines State Park. 
We thank the park 
rangers who so 
kindly loaned us 
these pictures for this issue 
of California Garden. 

— Editor 



Torrey Pines Extension Campaign 



by Arthur Matula 



A 



.S ANY GARDENER KNOWS, growing 

things need room to expand. 

This is true whether you're growing 
California redwoods for the expanding 
building market or geraniums for a dash 
of color in your patio. 

This particular need for natural things 
for growth has put one of California's 
most attractive and unusual plants in a 
dilemma. 

The plant is the Torrey Pine {Pines 
torreyana), a rather hardy and beautiful 
evergreen that has been growing for 
centuries in the loamy soil of San Diego 
County. 

At present, the best-kept stand of 
Torrey pines is concentrated in Torrey 
Pines State Park, an area atop a mesa 
just north of La Jolla. For thousands of 



visitors each year, a stop at the State 
Park is a thrill. The pines grow on a 
wind-swept mesa overlooking the Pacific. 
Many families picnic here while listening 
to the winds whistling through the pine 
needles. 

The torrey pine needs to expand in 
an area where within a few years or even 
months, developers' houses will block 
any means of extending the tree's grow- 
ing area. 

In addition to the State Park, the 
California Parks and Recreation Depart- 
ment has created a Torrey Pines State 
Reserve along the stream bed between 
the torrey pines mesa and the city of 
Del Mar. The area serves as both a 
reserve area for the park and a habitat 
for birds and wildlife. 



Nearby is property just perfect for an 
addition to the Torrey Pines State Park, 
land needed so that conditions for the 
continued growth of the trees will not 
die out. 

But it's private property and costly. 
The State of California has set aside 
nearly one million dollars, but the re- 
maining sum to purchase the land must 
come from private sources. 

With this in mind, the Torrey Pines 
Extension Drive was started earlier this 
year by the Torrey Pines Association, a 
non-profit organization dedicated to aid- 
ing the Torrey Pines State Park. Helping 
the Association is the San Diego Chapter 
of the Sierra Club. 

At this point, you might well ask: 
Just what's so all-out important about a 



12 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



pine tree? 

If you saw a torrey pine, your question 
might well be answered in the negative 
vein. The torrey pine is not a grand or 
dramatic tree, nothing as colossal as a 
redwood and only about one-third as 
tall as some of its cousins who cling to 
the sierras, the mountain pines. 

The torrey pine rarely grows higher 
than 30 feet. It sends out a moderate 
number of well-formed branches. Its 
needles are from five to 12 inches long, 
in clusters, and blue-green in color, and 
they probably make the tree's most strik- 
ing color feature, especially when seen 
in the fogs and rain that occasionally 
envelop their area. 

But the torrey pines can only grow 
in one small particular area of this coun- 
try, northwestern part of San Diego 
County; true, the trees also grow on Santa 
Rosa Island in the Santa Barbara Chan- 
nel, but for all practical purposes, these 
are inaccessible. 

There is evidence to show that the 
torrey pines sustained the Indians, who 
lived in the area for centuries, with fire- 
wood. The trees have no other value; 
in fact, few people burn them for fires. 
But the trees are old; they've been here 
for centuries. They are rare, like red- 
woods. They need to be encouraged to 
grow because they are part of a huge 
natural system that cannot stand too 
much tinkering by man. 

Fossil evidence tells us that the pines 
have been here for a long time. But 
they have been known to botanists only 
for a century or so. 

They were first catalogued by Dr. 
Charles Parry, a botanist and geologist 
with the United States-Mexico boundary 
survey and who stayed in the San Diego 
area from about 1850 to 1852. He noted 
the peculiar characteristics of the tree, 
realized he had made a discovery and 
named the species for his former botany 
instructor, Dr. John Torrey of Columbia 
University. 

Parry, it might be noted, was the first 
to plead for the conservation of the 
torrey pines. He visited San Diego again 
in the 1880's and saw that the strand of 
pines might be exterminated. His warn- 
ing led to the founding of a Torrey 
Pines Preserve, which was eventually 
turned over to the state in 1954 for 
maintenance. 

The Torrey Pines Extension Campaign 
has two goals in mind in acquiring the 
new growing area for the tree. First, and 




Torrey Pines looking toward the northern extension, the area across the salt 
marsh and at left of photo. The residential development has already reached 
oceanward toward the grove. If the acreage in question is sold to developers, 
there is not much doubt that the trees will fall. 




Borings indicate 
this tree may date 
as far back as 
1585 A. D. 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



13 



The Ring Bill Gull photographed at 
Torrey Pines by Ruth Stalnaker 





Beach Primrose (O. cheiranthifolia) 



The Torrey Pines 
Association . . . 

is a volunteer non-profit 
citizen group established in 
1950. The drive to pro- 
mote the Torrey Pines Re- 
serve, and the acquisition 
of the extension is primarily 
carried on by the associa- 
tion whose concern is to 
protect and preserve areas 
of great beauty and scien- 
tific interest. The Torrey 
Pines Association presently 
is the trustee organization 
for the fund-raising cam- 
paign. Gifts are tax deduc- 
tible. Any inquiries may be 
made to the 

Torrey Pines Association, 

Box 104, 7817 Ivanhoe, 

La Jolla, California 92037 

Phone 459-7366 



foremost, is to provide the sheer space 
needed to keep the species alive. Sec- 
ondly, the new acquisition will provide 
an area for a nature study center, a place 
where visitors may learn a complete nat- 
ural history of the area. Right now, the 
state park quarters are in an ancient (al- 
most antique) crowded building that is 
picturesque and not modern nor conven- 
ient. 

Visitors today to the park are knowl- 
edgeable and curious. They want to know 
about the geology, geography, wild plants 
and wildlife. They won't be able to do 
this until a nature center is constructed. 

Unless the expansion can be made, 
there is some doubt about the future of 
the torrey pine. The trees now are con- 
centrated into a small area (about eight 
square city blocks). Should any natural 
disaster strike, all might suffer. 

So it's a matter of good gardening ex- 
pansion to propagate the species. 

The Torrey Pines Extension Campaign 
is headquartered in La Jolla and wel- 
comes contributions. It's the only way 
to keep the Torrey Pines growing. ■ 




Above: 

The Great Blue Heron, 

found in the marsh 

area in all seasons. A 

solitary bird with massive 

wing span. Feeds on small 

fish and frogs. 



14 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



^M^AKO^ 







^cmlxV 



PLANS LAID FOR 

THE GROUNDBREAKING 

IN BALBOA PARK, NOVEMBER 9 

. . . it'll be a great day — be there 

for the official start of the construction of 

San Diego's beautiful new cultural building 



by Joan Betts, President, San Diego Botanical Garden Foundation, Inc. 



Sunday, November 9th at 2 p.m., ac- 
tual ground breaking ceremonies will take 
place for the replacement cultural build- 
ing on the site of the old Food and Bev- 
erage Building. 

The Committee of 100, headed by 
President Mrs. Frank Evenson, announced 
at her Board of Directors meeting that 
her committee is in charge of overall 
arrangements for this momentous occa- 
sion. The Botanical Garden Foundation 
Board of Trustees and the Foundation 
Councilors at their September meetings 
voted to participate in the ceremony with 
the assistance of the Floral Association. 
All interested and related botanical-gar- 
den-horticultural group representatives are 
urged to attend and take part on No- 
vember 9 th. 

This is the first exciting step toward 
our long anticipated occupancy in the 
new building that we will share upon 
completion with the Civic Arts for Youth 
and other related cultural groups officially 
sponsored by the Recreation Department. 

Construction of the building will start 
soon after this event and our enthusiastic 
attendance in numbers will help to show 
our acceptance of the new and beautiful 
building designed by Richard Wheeler, 
Architect. 



Mrs. Ross Pyle is general chairman of 
the ceremony and she outlined overall 
plans for the day at her meeting of Sep- 
tember 19, which was attended by Mrs. 
Walter Bunker, Virginia Norell (Editor 
of California Garden) and myself, 
representing our interests in the building. 
At least thirty active and stimulated 
committee members were present. 

Dignitaries headed by Mayor Frank 
Curran, City Council members, park 
members and many more have already 
been invited and will assist in the plaque- 
hanging as well as groundbreaking that 
day. 

There will be a minimum of speeches 
while lemonade and cookies are served, 
military bands will play and antique cars 
have been invited to add their color to 
the old-fashioned "Sunday in the Park" 
event. Over 2,000 parchment certificates 
will be distributed to all who attend, 
commemorating the day in our park his- 
tory. 

Speakers' platforms, parking and other 
details were discussed at this meeting to 
insure the success of the day as the plans 
develop in magnitude and support. 

The San Diego Botanical Garden Foun- 
dation urged the wearing of flowers either 
from our gardens or those available at 



the site in a key location. Large identical 
name tags designating our affiliations will 
be available at the site. For further color 
and identification it is urged that fresh- 
flowered hats be worn. 

Please watch local newspapers for more 
details and do save the date — November 
9th at 2 p.m. You'll be glad you came, 
for a fun-filled memorable afternoon fol- 
lowed by our long-waited start of con- 
struction on that beautiful site. ■ 



Foundation Meeting Report 

T 

JL HE FIRST MEETING of the '69-70 

Board of Trustees was held September 11 
at the Floral building. Members now 
serving the Foundation as officers and 
trustees are: President, Mrs. William E. 
Betts, Vice-President, Mr. Larry Sisk; 2nd 
Vice-President, Mr. Walter Andersen; 
Secretary, Mrs. Joseph Kenneally; Trea- 
surer, Mr. Sam Hamill. 

Other trustees are Mrs. Walter Bunker, 
Mrs. Everett Henderson, Stanley Miller, 
Howard Voss, H. M. Chadwell, Edwin 
Could, Joseph E. Jessop, Mrs. K. T. Mc- 
Reynolds, Mrs. Paul Witham, John Far- 
leigh, Captain Claude V. Hawk, Virgil 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



15 



Schade and Richard Streeper. 

Chairman of Councilors Mr. R. M. 
Middleton was present and spoke of the 
success of the "Sundays in the Park," 
held in the Floral Building this past year, 
and hosted by representive organizations. 

Plans were made concerning our part 
in the November 9 groundbreaking cere- 
mony in the park described further in 
this issue of California Garden. 

The Trustees also voted to give assist- 
ance to the San Diego Rose Society's 
proposed establishment of a permanent 
rose garden near the Botanical Lathhouse 
and the new beds in the park. 



The Board of Trustees cordially invite 
all California Garden subscribers and 
friends to join the Foundation by mailing 
their membership checks to Mr. Sam 
Hamill, Treasurer, Floral Building, Bal- 
boa Park, San Diego, California 92101. 
Memberships are: Annual Member $5.00, 
Family Membership $7.50; Contributing 
Member $25.00; Horticultural Society 
Member $10.00; Sustaining Member 
$100; Sponsor Member $250; and Or- 
ganization Member $100. Memberships 
are tax deductible and we welcome your 
support as we serve the Foundation to- 
gether. ■ 



SAN DIEGO BOTANICAL GARDEN FOUNDATION, INC. 

Officers elected July 10, 1969: 

President: Mrs. Wm. E. Betts. Jr. 

Vice-President: Mr. Larry L. Sisk 

2nd Vice-President: Mr. Walter Andersen 

Secretary: Mrs. Joseph J. Kenneally 

Treasurer: Mr. Samuel W. Hamill 

TRUSTEES 

Terms Expiring 1970 — One Year Term 

Betts, Mrs. Wm. E., Jr., 906 El Mac Place, San Diego 92106 ....223-7259 

Bunker, Mrs. Walter E., 4721 Bancroft Street, San Diego 92116 281-5027 

Henderson, J. Everett, 3503 Yosemite, San Diego 92109 ...274-1754 

Kenneally, Mrs. Joseph J., 2260 Catalina Blvd., San Diego 92107 223-6183 

Miller, Stanley W., 1590 E. Chase Ave., El Cajon 92020 444-8141 

Voss, Howard M., 1290 Birmingham Dr., Encinitas 92024 753-5415 

Terms Expiring 1971 — Two Year Term 

Chadwell, H. M., Rt. 1, Box M-32, Del Mar 92014 (32 South Lane)... ...755-9219 

Gould, Edwin, 7065 Neptune Place, La Jolla 92037 454-1519 

Jessop, Joseph E., 1041 Fifth Avenue, San Diego 92101 222-8158 

(414 La Cresentia Dr., San Diego 92106) 

Mc Reynolds, Mrs. K. T., Box 111, Del Mar 92014 (655 Zuni Dr.) 755-4047 

Sisk, Larry L., 3179 No. Mountain View Dr, San Diego 92116 283-2776 

Witham, Mrs. Paul, 5175 68th Street, San Diego 92115 463-4785 

Terms Expiring 1972 — Three Year Term 

Andersen, Walter, 4275 Napier Street, San Diego 92110 ....276-1142 

Farleigh, John, 2217 Whitman Street, San Diego 92103 ...295-5404 

Hamill, Samuel W., 4467 Ampudia Street, San Diego 92103 ...296-2605 

Hawk, Capt. Claude V. (Ret.), 1723 Hacienda Place, El Cajon 92020 ....448-5168 

Schade, Virgil H., 1633 Pennsylvania, San Diego 92103 298-1949 

Streeper, Richard, 1333 Wenatchee Ave., El Cajon 92021 448-0321 




—PHOTO BY BETTY MACKINTOSH 

TRIED OUR BUS TOURS? 

Photo above shows one of the 

interesting and historic sights 

in Southern California, the bells 

of San Juan Capistrano. This was 

taken during a San Diego Floral 

Association bus trip in August, 1969, 

For information on upcoming tours, 

see page 2 of this issue. 



AN IRISH BLESSING 

Sure, and may there be a road before 
you and it bordered with roses, the likes 
of which have ne'er been smelt or seen 
before, for the warm fine color and the 
great sweetness that is on them. 

* * * 

Go make thy garden fair as thou canst, 
Thou workest never alone; 
Eer chance he whose plot is next to thine 
Will see it, and mend his own. 

— Elizabeth Run del Charles 



* * 



* 



/ am only one, 

But I am one. 

I cannot do much, 

But I can do something 

What I can do I ought to do 

And what I ought to do 

With God's help I will do. 

— Edward Everett Hale 



16 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



Proteas 



A visit to the 

Escondido home 

and growing grounds 

of Howard Asper 



by Virginia Norell 




Protea Latifolia 



You think you might suddenly have 
been transported to a different land as 
you wander through the growing grounds 
at Howard Asper' s Escondido home. Here 
you think you have seen an old friend — 
an acacia? an oleander? — yet when you 
are closer to the plant you see to your 
amazement a strange and wonderful 
flower here and there, foliage that's very 
different. Looking about, you see your- 
self surrounded by plants you have never 
seen. (Unless you've been doing some 
botanical exploration in Africa and Aus- 
tralia lately!) 

Africa and Australia are the native 
homes of these exotic plants, the protea 
family. 

Although Mr. Asper, who was head 
horticulturist at the Huntington Gardens 
in Pasadena for years, was once primarily 
interested in camellias, he could not resist 
the lure of the proteaceae, or protea fam- 
ily, and more recently, the banksias of 
Australia. Mr. Asper still has large green- 
houses full of lush camellias, but spends 
most of his time with the exciting and 



exotic plants in the field. 

Betty Mackintosh and I headed north 
on Highway 395 one beautiful morning 
recently and at the Vista and San Marcos 
highway sign turned right up the gently 
sloping hill leading to the Asper's home. 

Coming up the driveway to the house, 
we were treated to a sight of two groves 
of Silver Trees, waving gently in the 
mild breeze, undergoing chame!eon-like 
changes of color as the long graceful 
leaves moved to and fro. Silver trees 
(Leucadendron argenteum) are blessed 
with cones (female trees) which almost 
appear to have been sprayed with silver. 
The leaves, of a grayish-green color, are 
covered with fine, silky, silvery hairs 
whose reflected light is part of the fasci- 
nation of watching the wind play among 
the branches. The trees are small, grow- 
ing to about 20 or 25 feet, marvelous for a 
grove along a sloping drive, as Mr. Asper 
has his. They live approximately 20 to 
25 years. Branches of the Silver Tree suit 
the arranger's most exotic tastes. The 
beauty of this plant continues as it drops 



cones from the female tree and pompons 
from the male tree. When pruned, the cut 
branches give lovely dried natural speci- 
mens for arrangements that will last al- 
most indefinitely. Specimens of leucaden- 
dron argenteum may also be seen at Quail 
Gardens in Encinitas. The pod contains 
as many as 20 seeds. They resemble black 
beans, and have a sort of parachute which 
makes it possible for them to be borne 
on the wind. 

Silver Trees are among the most 
spectacular members of the protea family. 
They grow in profusion near Capetown 
in South Africa. (It is amazing how many 
of the Southern California plants we 
know so well came from this area; Calla 
lilies, Clivia, Bird of Paradise are only 
a few.) 

The name "Protea" was given by Lin- 
naeus, the great Swedish botanist, after 
Proteus, the Greek god of the sea. Lin- 
naeus is thought to have given the name 
because of the infinite variety of life in 
the sea, since the proteas come in so many 

Continued 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



17 



te.|;||ps|«|; 




PHOTOS BY BETTY MACKINTOSH 




Protect nerifolia 
(Note the leaves- 
very similar to 
the oleander) 



BELOW , and on the 
opposite page, photos 
of the SILVER TREE 
(Leucadendron argenteum) 



Detail of foliage 






K I 



IM: 111 






: - ; £?l&?- >,*4 



* ■ 



" ■■' ■ :,: . 






Left, one of Mr. Asper's 
groves of Silver Trees 
shimmers in the light. 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



Leucospermum nutans, 

the "pincushion'' shrub, is 

beautiful in group plantings. 

Flowers vary in color from 

yellow to vivid oranges and reds. 




Left, the Leucospermum attenuatum 
with its attractive, long-lasting flowers 



. . . SILVER TREES 
Left, the female tree with 
its silver cone. 




A flower 

arranger's delight — 
the dried blossom of 
the male Silver Tree 



(Continued) 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



19 



Proteas, continued 

forms. These plants thrive in a coastal 
environment. Mr. Asper mentioned that 
several visitors from South Africa who 
have visited him and have seen his plants 
and their environment here, have said 
they doubt if the proteas could live in 
Southern California more than 2 5 miles 
inland from the ocean. 

The striking flower forms (so different 
to us they seem to have come from some 
other planet) measure as much as 12" 
across. After a plant is started, it takes 
two or three or perhaps four years to 
flower — but they are entirely worth wait- 
ing for. 



*Ed. Note: See "Silver Trees at Quail 
Park," California Garden, June- July, 
1966, by C. I. Jerabek. 



Another plant which is a genus of the 
family protea is the banksia. In Mr. 
Asper's experimental plot, where he is 



growing these plants, they upon first ob- 
servation make you feel that you have 
wandered into an alien landscape. There 
is the stimulation of the unknown which 
may produce wonders before your eyes, 
in contrast with the old familiar standby 
plants which are seen everywhere. True, 
these have their own nostalgic charm. But 
the world is full of things to discover, 
and that is the lure for the gardener who 
toils over his plot of earth with the 
patience and love to produce a flower 
that is a little different, a trifle more 
fragrant, or with better foliage effect in 
the garden. So Howard Asper has been 
lured (to our great benefit) to spend his 
time experimenting and developing those 
plants which are different and yet can be 
grown here to good advantage. 

Most of the choice flowers of the bank- 
sia experimental plot are cut and sent 
east. The shrubs are ideal as specimen 
plants in the garden. One of the most 
interesting Mr. Asper showed is one 
which grows approximately six feet wide 




and six feet tall. It typically requires two 
years of cultivation to reach this size. One 
of the most interesting features of the 
many varieties in this genus is the foliage 
— each variety has foliage of a different 
type, yet with similar features. Some look 
like juniper, some almost like podocarpus, 
and others like holly, very prickly. 




Paranomus Spicatus 



Banksia Media 



The story goes that banksia obtained its 
name when Captain Cook embarked on 
his historic voyages and took with him 
the renowned Sir Joseph Banks, who, in 
Australia, was so intrigued with these 
plants that he generously lent them his 
name. 

The proteas are known in their native 
habitat as the "sugarbush." When the 
Dutch first went to South Africa, they had 
no sweetener for their food, but soon 
discovered that the protea flower, at a 
certain stage of its development, will 
yield about a tablespoonful of nectar 
which can be had by the simple process 
of tipping the flower over a bucket. 
There are poems, songs and essays to the 
glory of the sugarbush in South Africa! 

Toward autumn, Mr. Asper collects the 
dried flowers and pods from the plants, 
packs them and sends them all over the 
country. Some of the proteas resemble 
an artistic form of artichoke. The King 
Protea, P. cynaroides, perhaps the most 
spectacular flower in the world, may grow 
to eleven or twelve inches across. Some- 



20 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 











Banksia Speciosa 



one once called this a "cross between a 
daisy and an artichoke." (It's interesting 
that the artichoke has the botanical name 
"Cynara." ) 

Leucospermum, the "pincushion," is a 
genus of the protea family that Mr. Asper 
especially likes. He has two or three 
large group plantings of these, and feels 
that they look and do better in groups. 
They bloom annually, from March through 
June, and bear as many as 94 flowers on 
a single shrub! The flowers last up to 
three or four weeks after cutting. There 
are four varieties of leucospermum grow- 
ing at Mr. Asper's home. These plants 
do well on a gentle slope with good drain- 
age and require practically no fertilizing. 
The fragile-looking flowers have such 
firm texture and appearance that one lady, 
seeing the flowers on display at an Es- 
condido exhibition, made the remark, 
"It's shameful for them to exhibit plastic 
flowers in a flower show!" Whereupon 
a friend of Mr. Asper's standing nearby 
and overhearing, said that of course this 
was a real flower. "Nonsense!" she re- 
torted, "I know plastic when I see it!" 

We suggest that you take a trip to 
Howard Asper's this next spring for a 
flight of fantasy that's reality. Flowers 
and plants that will reveal to you the 



fantastic variety of living things in the 
world. There's a hospitable welcome 
awaiting you just up the hill to the right 
of the Vista-San Marcos road sign, as you 



go north on Highway 395. If you get 
lost, call Mr. Asper at 1-745-7680. He'll 
be glad to have you come to see these 
wonders we've been talking about! ■ 




Protea obtusifolia produces blooms 
in red, yellow or pink 



Telopea speciosissima, red, 
very large, from Australia 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



21 



About Camellias 



Mission Hills Nursery: On 
Plant Selection 



A, 



.T the Mission Hills Nursery, Frank 
Antonicelli, who has a wide selection of 
camellias will tell you that there is 
more to plant selection than finding a 
plant that suits one's fancy. Camellias 
vary greatly. Almost any camellia will do 
well in a good potting mix, in a pot, in 
filtered sun with wind protection and a 
mild climate. But if one lives in Julian 
where it snows and temperatures drop or 
in the Borrego Desert where temperatures 
are high, special plant selection is neces- 
sary for success. Some camellias will take 
temperatures down to 5°. Others will 
take full sun except in the desert area. 
Some plants like a warm summer. 

Camellias vary in growth patterns as 
much as they vary in temperature likes 
and dislikes. Some plants make good 



Repotting House Plants 

The surest way of deciding whether a 
plant needs a larger pot is by checking 
the rootball. To do this, hold the hand 
on the topsoil, with stem between fingers, 
invert the pot, and give it a sharp rap on 
a hard object. If the soil is slightly moist 
the entire rootball will slide out easily. If 
a complete root network has formed over 
the ball and is beginning to grow out the 
sides, the plant needs repotting. 

Choose a pot a size or two larger than 
the old one. It's a good practice to soak 
new clay pots in water for an hour or so 
before use. Line the new pot with drain- 
age material — pebbles or broken pot 
pieces — and then add a thin layer of 
potting soil. 

Now place the rootball on this cushion 
and fill in with additional potting soil, 
leaving a half-inch or so between topsoil 
and the rim of the pot. Firm down the 
soil gently, thoroughly water, and the 
plant's new home ought to last for 
another year or so. 

Legginess, lopsidedness, or the presence 
of dead leaves and branches can be cor- 
rected with a cautious pair of scissors. 
Leggy plants are best renewed by cutting 
the plant back to within 6 or 8 inches of 
the topsoil. 

— From Potted Plant Information Center 



hedges and grow low and bushy, others 
grow straight and tall, some espalier more 
readily than others, and some take more 
kindly to being potted than others. But 
if a person likes camellias there are plants 
just for him, just for the spot in the 
garden he has; and if the one that has 
struck his fancy won't do in that spot, a 
wise nurseryman can help him find one 
that will do that has the same attraction 
of the one that won't do. 

Frank Antonicelli is always happy to 
look up any camellia in the camellia 
encyclopedia section of the Sunset book, 
"How to Grow and Use Camellias." Over 
700 varieties are listed by color with 
growth habits noted as well as the special 
need of each plant as to the amount of 
sun tolerance and cold resistance. 



TWO FAVORITE POTTING 
MIXES TO CONSIDER: 

Nurseries vary in recommendations 
for planter mixes and fertilizers and 
so do individuals, but all agree that 
drainage must be good and that any 
mix should be rich and porous. Here 
are two more favorite mixes. 

Mission Hills Nursery Mix 

1/3 oak leaf mold 
1/3 peat moss 

1/3 mixture of equal parts of loam 
and sand 

Clyde T. Higgins: San Diego 

Camellia Society Member's Mix 

1/3 peat moss 

1/3 ground redwood bark 

1/3 loam 



ROSE SYRUP 

FOR ROSE PETAL COOKIES 

Recipe by Jean Hersey 

This recipe calls for l/ 2 CU P or ~ rose 
water (rose syrup) and Mrs. Hersey tells 
in her book "The Shape of a Year," pub- 
lished by Charles Scribner's sons, just 
how easily rose syrup is made. 

She advises the use of half a dozen 
fragrant red roses that you are sure have 
no spray residue. Take off the petals and 
cut off the slightly bitter tasting base of 
each. Simmer the petals, covered, for 
about 1/2 hour in a small amount of water 
and a l / 2 CU P °f brown sugar. Strained, 
the result will make l l / 2 tall glasses of 
fluid that looks like wine and tastes the 
way roses smell. Now you are ready for 
the cookies. 

ROSE PETAL COOKIES 

Mix 2 cups of brown sugar with ll/ 2 
cups soft butter. Add 1 pinch of salt and 
1/2 teaspoon of nutmeg. Add another l/ 2 
cup of soft butter and mix well. 

Beat 3 eggs thoroughly and add l / 2 cup 
rose syrup. Stir this into the first mixture 
and add 2 cups of white flour and 2 cups 
of whole wheat flour. Roll on a well 
floured board quite thin and cut into 
rounds with a 3-inch diameter cookie 
cutter. Cook in an oven at about 300 de- 
grees for 15 minutes or until golden 
brown. Watch carefully, as they have a 
tendency to burn. 

This recipe makes dozens ! and they 
will keep all summer and longer in the 
freezer. 

Use deep red roses for syrup and the 
most fragrant ones you have. This gives 
the cookies a slightly pink cast. The 
flavor is subtle, but delicious. Can be 
made partly with honey and less sugar. 
This is something you must experiment 
with. They are really very good and an 
old English idea — that of using roses 
in cookies. 



454-0404 



Carlson Travel Service, Inc. 




A TRAVEL-EXPERIENCED STAFF 



1033 PROSPECT LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA 92037 P. 0. BOX 1453 



22 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 










■ ,>.-. 



iHlwlls 






"■•-'.- ■■ ■ . 



«i; 



rf 77^ Schott Place — Otay Mesa" 

This beautiful stand of Eucalyptus trees, shown at best advantage silhouetted 
against the sky, was probably planted about 1900 — the family who planted 
them long since gone. Betty Mackintosh couldn't resist capturing the sight 
with her camera, and shared the picture with us. 



SHORELINE NURSERY 

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AND BEDDING PLANTS 

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(Take Palomar Rd. off-ramp and to left to the 
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5870 AVENIDA ENCINAS, CARLSBAD 92008 Phone Toil-Free 753-1196, or 729-1128 



Do you have spare copies of back issues of California Garden? 

If so, please contact Mrs. Clarence Benson, 

3640 Crown Point Dr., San Diego, CA 92109 • 274-1626 



PILLEY'S GARDENS 
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• Spuria 

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• Median 

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also 

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at special discount 
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Valley Center, CA 92082 

745-2580 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



23 



Historical Reprints from our Early Pages 



THE LATH HOUSE 



With the coming of this month of 
October the lath house faces a condition 
when its inhabitants are likely to sigh 
for warmer and dryer situations with less 
rheumatism in the air. If rains succeed 
one another with any regularity a state 
of damp ensues that lasts for months. 
In view of this eventuality the lath house 
should be carefully culled over and its 
plants divested of every superfluous leaf 
and branch and in overgrown spots some 
dug up altogether. Air must be made to 
circulate freely. Plants that have thriven 
during the summer in complete shade and 
will dwindle and fade away under the 



same conditions in winter. Bearing this 
in mind the lath house attendant will 
easily discern what to do. Keep up the 
watering of violets and ferns, but let the 
tuberous begonias dry off so that the 
tubers may mature. Though these tubers 
have passed the winter successfully in the 
ground, the majority rot. The operation 
of preparing them for winter storing is 
much easier when they are grown in pots, 
and the writer has had the best success 
with them planted thus and the pots 
plunged in the earth. 

Cuttings of coleus should be made to 
be carried through the winter in the 



house. They thrive in a window if care- 
fully watered and the mealy bug is sub- 
dued. A soft paint brush and strong 
soap suds are most effective agents against 
mealy bugs, but the application is tedious. 
Few bulbs do very well under lath, an 
exception being the so-called large snow- 
drop. In fact it is quite a question 
whether a top that could be removed 
would not be a good innovation, and 
would be easily made where lath houses 
are moderate in size. Of course, this 
would debar growing things over the top, 
but this should not be done anyway. A 
combination of lath sides and strong 
muslin roof would make this uncovering 
easy, and would probably admit of a 
greater range in the varieties of plants 
grown inside. California Garden 
would be interested to have one of its 
readers try this experiment and report the 
results. 

The Garden hears that Dr. Francis 
Mead is making an experiment with or- 
chids under lath. If any one can make a 
success of innovations in floriculture, it 
is this gentleman. May his orchids take 
their place among his grateful patients. 

— California Garden, October, 1910 




SPECIALISTS 
IN PLANT 
AND SOILS 



Have your soil 
TESTED 

SALINITY - NUTRIENTS - MINERALS 



ALL ARE IMPORTANT TO THE SUCCESS 
OF YOUR GARDEN 

LEAF ANALYSIS 

FIND OUT EXACTLY WHAT 
YOUR PLANT IS UTILIZING 

ADVANCED TESTS 

474-5547 

30 W. 22nd St., National City, California 



Walter Andersen 
Nursery 

LARGEST SELECTION 
LANDSCAPE MATERIALS 

Nursery Stock and Garden Supplies 
for Beautiful Gardens 

We Specialize in Indoor Plants 

3860 Rosecrans San Diego 921 10 
Phone 296-6251 



CAROLYN 
BEAUTY SHOP 

CALL 234-5344 

121 W. Juniper-Just off First Ave. Bus 

Convenient Parking 



WHEN YOU MOVE 

Send new and old address, 

plus Zip code to 

California Garden 

Balboa Park, San Diego, Calif. 92101 



24 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 




Broivnies in southeast San Diego learn appreciation of 
nature through the marvel of a "growing thing." 



Gardening in 

natural environment 

or in their own 

b a cky a r d s—l ear n e d 

by S a n Diego 

Girl Sc o u ts 



by Donna Greenlaw 



G 



You Are Invited 
To Visit 

ANY GARDEN CLUB 
OF YOUR CHOICE 

See our Directory 
on Page 35 



LA MESA NURSERY 

'Everything for the Garden" 

Dramatize the garden. 

Nightscape with 12 volt garden lighting. 



Bankamericard Delivery 

Master Charge 

FREE GIFT WRAPPING 
8480 La Mesa Blvd. — 466-5703 



' 

1 
1 
' 

1 

1 
1 
1 

I 



irl scouts in desolate wooded 
areas on a nature badge or in a garden 
admiring flowers feel just as much at 
home as they would in a kitchen earning 
a homemaking badge. 

San Diego area girls accomplished 
many outdoor tasks during the past year, 
whether it be helping a garden club or 
planting trees for the future and their 
efforts were certainly noticed ! 

Claire Ackerman, Mary Dee Beattie, 
Christine Botti and Mary Ann McNich- 
ols, senior scouts from Troop 812 in 
Julian accompanied by Mrs. Dee Beattie 
and William Swadley a fire prevention 
technician, ventured out to Indian Flats 
Federal Forestry, a national park, nine 
miles north of Warner Hot Springs with 
49 Coulter pine trees. 

The girls spent the night at the site 
in order to complete their planting the 
next morning. Rain fell twice during the 
night while a surprise thunderstorm hit 
the next day. An unlucky situation pre- 
vailed as a happy one for the task of 
obtaining water from a well five miles 
away for tree watering was shortened 
considerably ! 

Junior Troop 99 (which is now 187) 
from Pacific Beach was so involved in 
gardening that they earned the name 



"Junior Gardeners" and have been spon- 
sored by the Pacific Beach Garden Club. 

Their projects included planting ice- 
plant along Mission Bay to combat ero- 
sion, cleanup projects, flower arranging, 
planting herbs for outdoor cookouts and 
planting dish gardens for their "Green 
Thumb" badge. 

Their efforts and new knowledge paid 
dividends in the spring as they won sec- 
ond place in Junior Club competition at 
California Garden Clubs State Conven- 
tion. 

Knowledge of nature is more than 
work and rain as campers and outdoor 
lovers will verify. 

It could be saving small children a 
few tears by supplying name tags at 
flower shows, it might even be feeling 
like "rich ladies" while gathering orchids 
for spring bouquets as Junior Troop 1016 
of Chula Vista did during a visit to 
Ridgeway Orchid Gardens in National 
City. 

It may even be astonishment that the 
"red" orchid is really painted and that 
flowers can be painted with floral paint 
sprays. 

Whatever it is, scouting and nature 
are fun, ask any Girl Scout! ■ 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



25 



A New California Garden Feature 



ECHEVERIA GIBBIFLORA 



SUCCULENTS OF THE SEASON 




Joseph's Coat 
(Opuntia vulgaris v arte gat a) 



J 



oseph's coat is a cactus of doubtful 
name, scientifically. Some authorities and 
the trade calls it OPUNTIA VULGARIS 
VARIEGATA. 

(o-pun'-ti-a or oh-pun'-shi-ah vul-gar'- 
us var'-i-a-ga'-ta) but other authorities 
say that is a mistake and the plant is 
really OPUNTIA MONOACANTHA 
VARIEGATA (mon'-o-a-can'-tha). From 
the descriptions I would go along with 
the second naming. The cactus is readily 
recognized from its common name as it 
refers to the mixture of colors in the 



pad which are white or yellow and pink 
mixed with the green background. 

This cactus is the subgenus PLATYO- 
PUNTIA, meaning it has flat pads. The 
genus name is derived from Opuntiani, 
the people who lived in the ancient city 
of Opus, Greece, where the true OPUN- 
TIA VULGARIS became naturalized. 
VULGARIS means, loosely, heavily spined 
and monoacantha means one-spined. Since 
Joseph's Coat is usually one-spined in the 
body of the pad, I would tend to accept 
O. Monoacantha Variegata as the correct 
species. 

The plant will grow to five feet tall 
and eventually develops a sturdy trunk. 
The areoles are fairly far apart on the 
pads and there is usually a single spine 
from each. Young pads may have up 
to three spines per areole. It will grow 
under varying conditions so long as the 
soil drains readily. Joseph's Coat grows 
fast from single pad cuttings and will 
do so under cramped conditions. It 
blooms rather young and has a yellow 
flower followed by a red fruit. 

The colors in the plant are apparently 
at their most intense in full sun to light 
shade, although some plants color very 
nicely in heavier shade. It can be fairly 
spectacular and many people will want 
it as a focal point among their normally 
green collection. 

(By L. N. Phelps) 




Echeveria Gibbiflora 



ronunciation is given three ways: 
esh-eve-EE-ria, ech-e-VEER-i-a and ek-e- 
VEE-ree-ah but the plant is definitely 
named for D. Atansio Echeverria the 
Mexican botanical artist who did the illus- 
tration for FLORA MEXICANA 1858. 
Gibbiflora (jibbi-FLO-ra) means having 
flowers with a swelling or hump on one 
side. So you don't have to look that up 
in your Funk and Wagnalls. 

Broadly spatulate leaves are rounded 
above, keeled below, from five to ten 
inches long and half as wide, gray-blue 
in color with pink undertones. The red- 
dish urn-shaped flowers are borne on 
scapes up to twenty inches long in a 
one-sided cluster. E. Gibbiflora is one 
of the largest of the heavy stemmed, 
branching types. 

The variety METALLICA naturally 
possesses a conspicuous metallic sheen 
which can be a gorgeous sight to behold 
when after years of regular care it reaches 
two to three feet with a bonus of scarlet 
flowers. The leaves are rounded at the 
apex and are a soft pinkish bronze with 
white and red along the margins. (Color 
description by Chidamian) Let's hope 
someone brings such a beauty to share 
visually for it sounds fantastic! 

Variety CARUNCULATA has curious- 
ly puckered, blister-like growths on the 
leaf surface, more curious than appealing. 
Offsets are rarely produced but flower 
stems can be used for cuttings, allowing 
several leaves for each cutting and much 
patience. (Butterfield in the Jan-Feb. 
1958 NATIONAL JOURNAL has more 
to say that I can condense. So does the 
leading authority Eric Walther in the 
Mar- Apr. issue of the same year.) 

Variety CRISP ATA has crinkled leaf 
margins with plantlets sometimes forming 
on the flower stalks. 

Echeveria Gibbiflora hybridizes easily 
in nature and for man and many named 
hybrids are available from Henrietta's 
Nursery in Fresno, California. All the 
varieties make splendid houseplants and 
coloring is more vivid when grown out 
in the open. As they seem to be especially 
susceptible to root nematodes, it is well 
to investigate the roots if the plants seem 
to be gradually weakening. If you spot 
any knot-like swellings — OFF with the 
roots including the base of the stem, then 
re-root. Start with healthy plants in equal 



26 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



parts sandy loam, well-rotted leafmold 
and good sharp sand, providing good 
drainage and protection from frost. 

In order to retain the large cabbage 
type rosette, it is well to keep the flower- 
ing stalks pinched out — if one has the 
heart to do it. Since there are so many 
varieties within the species, all of which 
are eligible for the bragging table, we 
should have a great selection of hand- 
some plants. ■ 

(Nibby) 



Every Sunday afternoon 

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Nature's 
Wonders: 

Milkweed 



* * 



All that we are is the result of what we 
have thought; it is founded on our 
thoughts, it is made up of our thought. 
If a man speaks or acts with a pure 
thought, happiness follows him like a 
shadow that never leaves him. 

— Buddha 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 
ADVERTISEMENTS PAY! 

• Our readers form an appreciative and select group. 
Whether you have a restaurant, investment firm, 
hotel, recreational facility, building firm, garden 

business or you name it! We can do a good 

job for you. 

Call or Write. 

We will be glad to help. Mrs. Virginia Norell, 

9173 Overton Ave., San Diego 92123 — 277-8893. 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



27 




Calendar of Care 



PUNTS AND THEIR ENVIRONMENT 

by George James 
Garden Care Feature Writer 



This is the gospel of labor, 

Ring it, ye bells of the kirk, 

The Lord of love came down from above 

To live with men who work. 

This is the ROSE HE planted, 
Here in the thorn-cursed soil; 
Heaven is blessed ivith perfect rest, 
But the blessing of earth is toil. 

— Henry vanDyke 



T, 



he past installments have dealt 
with the environmental needs of plants 
as they were related to soil, and some 
suggestions have been given for soil im- 
provement and the preparation of plant- 
ing holes. 

All through the previous articles the 
need of drainage in the soil has been 
stressed. Irrigation of plants can be per- 
formed in such a manner that the prob- 
lem of drainage, where it exists, is not 
so likely to damage the plants. Plants 
which are growing in compact soils, where 
the drainage is poor, are more likely to 
suffer from over-irrigation than under- 
irrigation. 

There are several factors which in- 
fluence the need for irrigation, or which 
may make the need more or less at one 
time or one place than at another time 
or in another place. 

Irrigation is necessary in this area be- 
cause of the relatively arid conditions 
which exist, and because of the diverse 
water needs of the plants we use. Nearly 
all of the plants used in gardens in this 
area grew as native or wild plants in 
some other part of the world, where the 
rainfall might have been either greater, or 
more consistent than here. 



If these plants are to grow well here, 
the gardener must supply them with an 
irrigation program that is close to the 
rainfall they received in their native en- 
vironments. 

Some plants will not tolerate over- 
watering to the slightest degree, while 
other kinds of plants stand a soil that 
stays moist nearly all the time. 

Study Water Needs 

It is wise for a gardener to study the 
water needs of his plants before he places 
them in his garden, and plant those with 
similar water needs in one area, and those 
with greatly different needs in another, 
so each group may be treated according 
to their needs. Another factor which in- 
fluences the frequency and duration of 
irrigations is the soil in which the plants 
are growing. 

Watering Clay or Adobe 

Clay or adobe soils retain water much 
longer than sandy soils, so as a rule 
clays or adobes can be irrigated less fre- 
quently than sands, and this holds true 
where the subsoil is clay or adobe with 
a layer of sand or loam above. Clay and 
similar soils not only hold water for a 



longer time, but they also take in water 
very slowly, and are most effectively wet 
by applying water as a fine spray for 
short periods of time. Water is applied 
until it starts to puddle or run away, 
then the water is turned off, or the 
sprinkled moved to another location, then 
after the excess water at the surface has 
soaked into the soil, more can be ap- 
plied, and this process repeated several 
times until the soil is wet to the desired 
depth. 

Watering Sandy-Loamy Types 

Sand and loam soils, with their large 
soil pores, permit irrigation water to soak 
in more quickly, so water may be applied 
faster and for longer periods without ex- 
cess collecting on the surface. These soils 
do not retain the water as long as the 
clay soils, so will need more frequent 
irrigations. The addition of humus to 
any of these soils will improve their 
ability to accept and to hold water. Hu- 
mus particles will increase the size of the 
soil pores in the clay. This increases the 
rate at which the water can penetrate, and 
will partially fill the large pore spaces in 
sand. Thus they may retain water in 



28 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



larger amounts for a longer period of 
time. 

Influence of the Seasons 

The seasons of the year have an influence 
on the amount of water needed by plants. 
When the weather it hot, windy, if the 
humidity is low, or even when any com- 
binations of these conditions occur, the 
amount of water used by plants can be 
doubled. During such periods extra irri- 
gations may be called for. At least, over- 
head sprinklings may be needed to pre- 
vent damage to plants from shortage of 
water. Overhead sprinklings, sometimes 
referred to as "misting," provides free 
water on the surface of the soil, on the 
leaves, and other areas around the plant. 
This water evaporates, increasing the 
humidity around the plant, so the plant is 
not forced to discharge as much water 
into the air as it would if the humidity 
were lower. As a result of this, the soil 
will not dry out as quickly, and there is 
less effort required on the part of the 
plant. 

During the spring and fall seasons 
when the days are shorter and the tem- 
peratures less, the water needs of the 
plants are reduced. Santa Ana weather 
conditions do occur in the fall, and the 
watering program must be adjusted to 
compensate for the excessive water de- 
mand these conditions create. 

The days are shorter and the tempera- 
tures lower during our winter months, so 
the plants water needs at this time are 
the lowest. Our rains are not to be re- 
lied upon, but when they do come the 
need of further irrigation for some time 
following is eliminated. 

Rainwater Helps 

The pure rainwater does much to move 
the accumulated alkali salts downward in 
the soil, often below the root zone, so 
alkali is less of a problem following win- 
ters of normal or greater than normal 
rainfall. Plants which can be easily dam- 
aged by too much water, especially those 
in clay or abobe soils, can be protected 
from too much water in the rainy season 
by removing basins which would hold 
water close to the plant. If basins are 
leveled and the soil close to the stem of 
the plant made a fraction of an inch 
higher than the surrounding soil, the ex- 
cess water will flow away from the plant 
and be less likely to wet the soil in the 
root zone to the degree that the roots of 
the plant will be damaged. This opera- 
tion should be completed prior to the 



first rain, for some plants can be seriously 
damaged by even one super-soaking. 

Effect of Planting Pattern 



The size and the concentration of the 
plants, or roots of plants, in a given area 
can influence the amount of water needed 
to maintain soil moisture suitable for 
good growth. Small, young plants, have 
fewer leaves than older, more mature 
plants. Thus, their water needs are less 
at this time, but will increase as they 
become larger and develop more leaves. 
Sometimes roots of trees have grown into 
an area, removing a great deal of water 
from the soil. This makes longer and 
more frequent waterings of such areas 
necessary. Roots of large trees can ex- 
tend for great distances from the tree 
itself. Roots of trees planted in park- 
ways have been found in back yards, and 
large trees on the other side of the neigh- 
bor's garden may have their roots in 
your rose bed. 

Invading Roots 



Areas which seem to dry out quickly 
may be suspect of having invading roots 
in them, one answer to such a problem 
is to irrigate and fertilize enough to satisfy 
the needs of all the roots in the bed. 
Garden areas situated at the edge of a 
slope planted to iceplant will often have 
a strip of the garden parallel to the ice- 
plant where the growth of the plants or 
lawn is less than at other places in the 
garden. Iceplant deprives other plants 
of a good part of their food and water. 

What Time of Day? 



The question of what time of day is 
the best to irrigate is often asked. There 
are some advantages to both day and 
night irrigation which are not too im- 
portant when compared to the convenience 
of the person doing the watering. 

There are many automatically con- 
trolled sprinkler systems which operate at 
night and usually no ill results are seen. 
The advantages to night irrigation are: 
less water loss through evaporation; 
higher water pressure, which gives better 
sprinkler coverage; less wind, which per- 
mits a more even distribution of water; 
and in the case of public recreational 
areas, night watering permits greater day- 
time use of the area. 

The greatest disadvantage to night 
watering is the encouragement of diseases 
on plants that are susceptible. Roses and 
some ornamental shrubs are subject to 
mildew, the growth of which is encour- 



aged when the leaves remain wet over- 
night. Fine grass and dichondra lawns 
are subject to disease problems when they 
consistently remain wet overnight. For- 
tunately, the hardy bermuda grass which 
is found in so many lawns, and many of 
the shrubs we use, do not suffer from dis- 
eases so can be watered at night without 
problems. 

The best irrigation practices are those 
which provide enough water for the 
plants, yet not too much, and wet the soil 
deeply so the development of deeper 
roots is encouraged. As a general rule, 
deep, less frequent waterings are better 
for plants than frequent shallow water- 
ings. 

Frequent waterings tend to keep the 
upper pores of the soil full of water 
which prevents the free flow of air to the 
lower levels, which can cause the start 
of root damage and the resulting weaken- 
ing of the plants. Like all good rules, 
there are some exceptions to this one, one 
being the case of newly-planted annuals 
or other small plants, which will have 
very limited root systems at the start. In 
warm weather, these may need to be 
watered once a day or more until a bet- 
ter root system is developed. Then the 
frequency of waterings should be reduced 
gradually until the plants are being 
watered every five to seven days. 

Frequent waterings when continued for 
a long period of time cause the plants 
to develop the greater part of their roots 
close to the surface of the soil. Plants 
with shallow root systems are more easily 
tipped over by wind or accumulation of 
water on their foliage, and are less able 
to cope with hot, dry, or windy weather. 

Shallow waterings tend to cause the 
accumulation of alkali salts close to the 
soil surface, while deeper waterings are 
likely to carry these salts lower into the 
soil, where they may be less of a problem. 
Shallow roots of plants are more likely to 
disrupt pavement and are more competi- 
tive with the roots of smaller plants in 
the same area. 

Trees or shrubs which are planted in 
lawn or ground cover areas, where shallow 
irrigation is adequate for the needs of 
the small plants, will be benefited with a 
deep irrigation every three to four weeks 
which will encourage the roots of the 
shrubs and trees to develop deep into the 
soil. 

When one becomes aware of all the 
factors which affect the plants' need for 
water and the desirability of watering 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



29 



deep enough for the proper root develop- 
ment of the plants being grown, and how 
much these factors can change from one 
garden to another, the wisdom of each 
gardener establishing his own garden ir- 
rigation program, based on the needs that 
exist in his garden, can be seen. 

Check the Water Penetration 

A desirable irrigation program, one 
that meets the plants water needs with- 
out overdoing it, is easier to establish if 
the gardener has some way of knowing 
how moist the soil is and how deeply the 
recent irrigation penetrated. A probe, 
which may be an iron rod or a long 
screwdriver, can be used to decide whether 
it is time for another irrigation, and to 
find out how deeply the soil was wet. 
When checking to see if it is time to ir- 
rigate again, the probe will meet resist- 
ance three to four inches below the sur- 
face of the soil, and the day after irriga- 
tion the depth of the penetration of the 
water can be felt by pushing the probe 
down until it meets resistance from the 
dry subsoil below. With very little prac- 
tice you can quickly get an idea of the 
moisture in the soil, enabling you to ir- 
rigate intelligently. A hole may be dug, 
where possible, with a trowel or shovel 
which will reveal the same conditions as 
the probe will, and there are meters 
available which will immediately reveal 
whether a soil is dry, moist, or wet. Any 
of these methods will be a great help to 
a gardener in the establishment of his 
irrigation program, providing him with 
facts and not guesses upon which to base 
his practices. These methods may also 
be used once a program has been estab- 
lished to be sure the program is still 
meeting the needs of the plants involved, 
and also used in periods of great heat, 
wind, or of low humidity, to determine 
additional applications of water are 
needed. 

Some other guides to the frequency of 
watering, which may be helpful in estab- 
lishing your irrigation program will be 
told in the next installment. ■ 



Patronize 

Our 
Advertisers 1 . 




Jl 




by Larry Sisk, 

San Diego County Dahlia Society 



The easiest way to get knowledge is 
to learn by doing. That's especially true 
about gardening, raising dahlias or what- 
ever one chooses. 

The garden is an excellent classroom, 
and the student should pay attention. 

For example, it was only after years 
of planting small dahlias close together — 
because they are small — that it was real- 
ized that for the best small dahlias they 
should be planted at distances apart equal 
or even more than the larger varieties. 

Even if the gardener raises dahlias 
just for the color in the yard or for cut- 
ting to take in the house, it's a good idea 
to give each plant plenty of room to 
spread out. 

The object with small dahlias is to 
grow them small, and the way to keep 
them small is to pinch out the growing 
tips two, three or more times. This makes 
the plant bush out, and as it spreads it 
should have room. Otherwise, by mid- 
season the plant will be such a tangle of 
branches that its source for flowers will 
be almost valueless. 

Proper spacing is especially needed if 
the poms and miniatures are being grown 
for exhibition; thus, as the plant spreads 
there will be room to put in more stakes 
and to tie up the branches to keep flower- 
ing stems straight. The extra space also 
makes insect and mildew control easier. 



In planning next year's dahlia plant- 
ing, a minimum of 30 to 36 inches square 
should be allowed for each hill — for 
either small or large variety. Dahlias 
grown in rows should be about 36 inches 
apart; the rows can be 20 to 24 inches 
apart if wide paths are provided between 
each two rows. The paths are ideal at 44 
to 48 inch widths. 

The value of tying each cane of the 
larger varieties is another lesson learned 
in the dahlia garden classroom. Other- 
wise, succeeding crops of blooms will 
bend and crawl to the ground, producing 
such crooked stems that even the most 
adept arranger would be baffled. Heavy 
blooms and summer breezes also call for 
staking and tying, to prevent losing the 
flowers. 

Other lessons learned include: Failure 
to spray to prevent insects will result in 
infestations that sometimes are hard to 
overcome; failure to water properly (when 
the plants need water) results in a de- 
cline in plant growth; failure to fertilize 
results in small and poor blooms; over- 
fertilizing with high-nitrogen fertilizer 
will produce lots of bush, rubbery stems, 
and not so many flowers. 

At this time of the year, the dahlia 
"student" should be ready to graduate 
if he paid attention, and next year's ef- 
forts will be much improved. 



30 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



IF 



^y 



rfa or 




by Morrison W. Doty 

San Diego Fuchsia Society 



Readers! Gardeners! 

Send your ad in NOW to Editor Vir- 
ginia Norell, 9173 Overton Avenue, 
San Diego, California 92123. Mini- 
mum charge, $1.00 per line (or ap- 
proximately seven words per line). 
Please send remittance with your 
copy by November 10 for the De- 
cember-January issue. 

Classified Ads Cost Little 
and Bring Great Returns 



F 



ortunate fuchsia fanciers in south- 
ern California can enjoy balmy Indian 
Summer in their gardens much longer 
than other locations, with occasional re- 
peats even in midwinter, although with- 
out the brilliant autumn colors Easterners 
love so much. 

However, certain extremes of tempera- 
ture and humidity during such beautiful 
weather, and perhaps winds, may present 
real problems to the new gardener here. 
Occasionally dry hot days, between quite 
cool, damp, foggy nights, may even kill 
container plants. Before you know it 
they're too dry, unless watered every day. 
Some of the hottest days of the year may 
come in October, unexpectedly. 

Having the growth cycle of a deciduous 
shrub, fuchsias normally need their rest 
period in winter. Like many other plants, 
though, they may be made or allowed to 
bloom out of season in our mild Southern 
California climate. We should reduce 
gradually the feeding and watering as 
autumn advances, to induce the natural 
dormancy that is essential for good plants 
next year. Older plants may languish and 
die if carried on blooming too long. They 
should be retired earlier than fresh vig- 
orous young plants, which may be fed 
and watered to bloom even into holiday 
season. 

Bushes and plants in the ground in 
this area need little extra care in autumn, 
except perhaps some mulching in very 
cold, exposed places, and whatever fall 
pruning is decided upon. Baskets and 
container plants, however (more and more 
seen in most gardens here), do need more 
care now. Containers should be repaired 
if needed, new soil added sometimes, and 
perhaps placed in a protected warmer 



nook for winter. Winds are bad for 
fuchsias, any time. 

Discreet fall pruning is now generally 
advocated. Some successful growers, even 
nurserymen, prefer most of it then, rather 
than all in the spring, claiming less danger 
of frost-kill or die-back. The tendency of 
fuchsias, especially old ones, to grow tall 
and straggly late in the season, perhaps 
with foliage only at the tips, makes us 
glad to trim and shape them up then to 
their proper type again. They will stand 
cutting back at least two-thirds, or even 
to the first two or three nodes of new 
growth if necessary, for shaping back to 
their type, provided they're well cared for 
afterwards. Old, tired plants need rest 
by late summer, and young, vigorous ones 
to be carried on in bloom later, should 
not be fed for too much lush growth late 
enough to be killed by frost. Basket and 
container plants may do well on only 
enough watering to feel dry under the 
surface, and liquid fish-based feedings 
perhaps only three or four weeks apart, 
through their dormancy now. 

When pruning fuchsias, either fall or 
spring, keep in mind always which of the 
main four types it best conforms to. 
Shape it so, then pinch tips to maintain 
conformation as it thickens up in growth 
to a perfect plant. Bush types in the 
ground may be left high, of tall varie- 
ties for background, with low growing 
ones for foreground or border, but all 
cut far back, for abundant bloom is al- 
ways on the new growth. They withstand 
more cutting than plants in containers. 
Basket plants, trailing, or semi-trailing 
should have uprights, weak and cross 
growth cut, and trimmed about to con- 

Continued, page 34 



You Are Invited 
To Visit 

ANY GARDEN CLUB 
OF YOUR CHOICE 

See our Directory 
on Page 35 



GROW OLD ALONG WITH ME 

Grow old along with me! 

The best is yet to be; 
The last of life, for which the first 

xv as made; 
Our times are in His hand who sa'ith, 

"A whole I planned; 
Youth shows but half; trust God, 
See all, nor be afraid!" 

— Robert Browning from 
Rabbi Ben Ezra 



* * 



There is always room for beauty memory 
A myriad lovely blossoms may enclose. 
But whate're hath been, there 

still must be 
Room for another rose. 

— Trances Earle Coate 



''The greatest ideal that man can aspire 
to is not to be a shoiv case of virtue, but 
fust a genial likeable and reasonable hu- 
man being." 

— Lin Yutang 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



31 



fn\ 



y^y 




by Richard D. Streeper, 
President, San Diego Rose Society 



T, 



His is ONE of the very best times of 
the year for roses. The plants are grow- 
ing much more slowly now than in the 
spring and summer. Blooms should hold 
their form and color very nicely on the 
bush. There is little to do other than to 
relax and enjoy your success as a rose 
grower. 

This is also one of the very best times 
of the year for Sphaerotheca pannosa. 
This is that common plant which all of 
us seem to cultivate in our rose gardens. 
For those less botanically inclined, let's 
refer to it as rose mildew or powdery mil- 
dew. This is a good time of year to learn 
more about the nature of rose mildew and 
attempt to put some of this knowledge to 
use in our garden. 

Rose mildew is a fungus. For our pur- 
poses, we may assume that it exists only 
on roses. Other types of mildew found in 
the garden on chrysanthemums, calendu- 
las and zinnias, to name a few, will not 
affect roses. Two types of spores are 
produced by the fungi. The first type, 
called conidiospores, grows best in San 
Diego in the late spring, up until the 



heat of summer, and in the late fall. This 
type of spore grows in a chain-like for- 
mation over the surface of the rose leaf 
with a powder-like appearance, from 
which comes its common name. When 
the spores have developed in sufficient 
number they can be easily dislodged and 
can continue to grow if they land on an- 
other rose leaf. The spores send tiny 
tubes into the rose leaf to support their 
life and in this way can permanently dam- 
age the leaf surface. 

The second type of spore is produced 
in the late fall and winter months. These 
are called ascospores and they are asso- 
ciated with the overwintering of mildew. 
The ascospores will remain dormant un- 
til the spring at which time they infect 
the new rose growth. It should be noted 
that the conidiospores also have the 
ability of overwintering in the growth 
buds of the rose. 

Most rose growers are aware that mil- 
dew grows well at certain times of the 
year, sometimes in spite of our efforts to 
eradicate it. At other times of the year, 
it grows not at all, even in the absence of 



SHARE YOUR FLOWER AND PLANT IDEAS! 

We welcome readers' contributions. If you have an idea for an article you'd like to 
write, phone the editor, who will be glad to assist you with it. Or, pass on those handy 
tips we all enjoy running onto; write a letter to the editor if you have something to 
say that you think our readers would like to hear. We enjoy hearing from you, and 
welcome new contributors. Write or phone: Mrs. Virginia Norell, Editor, Califor- 
nia Garden magazine, 9173 Overton Avenue, San Diego, California 92123. 277- 
8893. Copy is due 30 days before publication. (Tenth of January, March, May, July, 
September, November.) 



any preventive spray program. Mildew 
requires humidity of 90-95 percent to 
grow. The humidity at the leaf surface 
is commonly very much higher than that 
in the air in the garden. The humidity 
on the leaf surface is a function of the 
general humidity in the air, the moisture 
in the plant, the solar radiation on the 
leaf surface and air circulation. 

One last bit of technical information 
and then we will try to put some of this 
information to use. Susceptibility to mil- 
dew is an inherited factor in roses. Many 
types of roses will not support ascospores. 
A lesser number are inhospitable to coni- 
diospores. There is a broad range of 
susceptibility within those cultivars which 
are susceptible to mildew. 

The first step to avoid mildew can be 
taken in the planting plan for your gar- 
den. Try to keep leaf humidity as low 
as possible at all times. In this regard, 
full sun in the morning and evening is 
desirable. Plant roses where they will get 
good air circulation. If you can't avoid 
shade or still air, then you might be more 
satisfied if you choose cultivars which 
have a high degree of mildew resistance. 
There are several good hybrid teas and 
floribundas which are completely free of 
mildew in San Diego and great improve- 
ments are being made by plant hybrid- 
izers in new roses being introduced in 
commerce. If you have problem plants 
or problem areas, space the plants farther 
apart or thin the center of the plant dur- 
ing the spring and fall to increase sun- 
light on the leaves and air through the 
plant. 

Conidiospores can be washed from the 



32 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



rose leaves until such time as they become 
firmly attached. Thus, frequent washing 
with water constitutes a good method of 
control provided no major infestation is 
present. Clean foliage also reduces the 
ability of drifting spores to attach them- 
selves to the leaves. In this regard, an 
overhead sprinkling system may have 
much to commend it with regard to the 
control of mildew. 

As indicated earlier in this article, fall 
is a very important time of the year for 
one who would control mildew in his 
garden the following year. If all spores 
were killed or removed from the garden 
as they appear, there will be little mildew 
the following spring. A regular spray 
program should be established and any 
leaves which are significantly infested 
should be removed from the yard. Dur- 
ing the winter when you are pruning and 
applying dormant spray, remember that 
conidiospore mycelium may be lurking 
in the new growth buds and ascospores on 
the wood or in the ground, so try to get 
good spray coverage with a strong fungi- 
cide. 

Perhaps the greatest problems in con- 
trolling mildew is that of getting good 
spray coverage when applying chemicals 
to prevent or eradicate mildew. Most 
sprays which are sold to control mildew 
will kill the mildew within a very few 
minutes and success or failure should 
be apparent by simple visual examination. 
However, in Southern California we have 
a special problem with our water and 
many of the sprays which are not made 
specially for use here do not work satis- 
factorily unless a wetting agent is used. 
To determine if your spraying technique 
is adequate examine your bushes immedi- 
ately after applying the spray and insure 
that all of the surfaces of even the most 
remote leaves have been completely wet- 
ted. Then examine any mildew on the 
plant about ten minutes or so after spray- 
ing, when the spray has dried. If the 
mildew does not appear to be matted and 
gray, either the wetting agent has not 
permitted penetration of the fungicide 
through the fungus, or the concentration 
of spray was not as directed on the label. 
With careful experimentation, you will 
be able to come up with the right combi- 
nation of wetting agent and fungicide 
and even the most severe infestation of 
mildew should be capable of elimination 
with no more than three applications of 
fungicide at five-day intervals. ■ 



A DAY OF ROSES 

In the wind of sunny ]une 
Thrives the red rose crop, 

Every day fresh blossoms blow 
While the first leaves drop; 

White rose and yellow rose 
And moss-rose choice to find, 

And the cottage cabbage rose 
Not one whit behind. 

— Christina Rossetti 



It isn't so much the way things are 
As the way we look at a thing. 

There's always the notes of a 

merry song 
For the voice that is ready to sing. 

And "Roses have thorns" is a 

stupid cry, 
For though it may all be so, 

I think ive had better be telling 

the world 
That thorns have roses, you know. 

— F. J. Boyce 



Every rose on a little tree 

Is making a different face at me ! 

Some look surprised when I pass by, 
And others droop — but they are shy. 

These two whose heads together press 
Tell secrets I could not even guess. 

Some have their heads thrown 

back to sing, 
And all other buds are listening. 

I wonder if the gardener knows, 
Or if he calls each fust a Rose. 

— Rachel Field 





G. S. JOHNSON ROSE NURSERY 

Rose Specialists 

Bushes - Climbers - and Tree Roses 

in cans, available all year 

Spray Materials and Fertilizers 
22 YEARS IN SAME LOCATION 



8606 Graves Ave., Santee 
corner Graves & Prospect 

Open 8 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. 



Off Highway 67 
Phone: 448-6972 

Closed Wednesdays 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1969 



33 



Iceland Poppies, Continued 

the poisons to leach away and leave the 
soil safe for seedlings. 

When the Iceland Poppy is planted in 
combination with Blue Flax (Linum 
perenne) its exquisite colors and delicate 
beauty will be enhanced. If scattered 
blooms are desired throughout the season 
do not allow the seed pods to develop. 

The Iceland Poppy has been favored 
by many well-known California garden 
enthusiasts who have developed various 
strains in the garden by root division 
method. 

These lovely, fragrant, nodding blooms 
will captivate those with the most dis- 
criminating tastes, today, as they did in 
the past. This Iceland Poppy is truly a 
California favorite. 

The following varieties are in the 
trade: Album, Aurantiacum, Coccineum, 
Croceum, Striatum, and Sulphureum. 



PRAYER FOR A LITTLE GARDEN 

God of all gardens 

Please remember mine 
With rain to comfort it 

And a sun to shine, 

With a hope for every seed, 
With patience that will wait, 

And love to keep the border clean 
And the furrows straight. 

God of all the gardens 

That lie from sea to sea, 
Let this one bloom, with faithfulness 

For sharing it with me. 

— From the Herbalist 
by Arthur Ketch urn. 



Fuchsias, Continued 

tainer edge; then good care afterwards. 

Tree types, from good vigorous upright 
varieties, are best supported very straightly 
up to the desired height before the tip is 
touched; then rub off the side buds below, 
and pinch to thicken up the head growth 
round and full. 

Espaliers, of delicate, fine growing 
varieties are maintained with less drastic 
pruning after their main design is estab- 
lished. Excess side growth is cut if it is 
diverting too much strength from the 
plant, and its main laterals. 

Any pruning time makes cuttings of 
some favorite varieties we would like 
to propagate more plants from, and al- 



though spring is best for that, some 
growers start lots of cuttings in late sum- 
mer and fall also. 

Cut with sharp shears vigorous new tip 
growth about three inches long, press 
down firmly into sharp, moist sand, or 
vermiculite, in starting flat, or better, tiny 
plastic plant cups, and place in a warm, 
protected nook with filtered sun. In 
about three weeks plants should be ready 
to transplant, in good weather. This is 
a good time to browse the nurseries for 
some holiday gifts of plants that may give 
pleasure longer than most other gifts, 




perhaps, to some of your friends, or even 
yourself. 

Our little exotic tropical rain-forest 
plant is an excellent choice for such an 
unusual gift. There are so many (actu- 
ally over 3000 name varieties) both new 
and old to charm any gardener. 

This area is fortunate in having fine 
fuchsia nurseries. Some are worthy of 
tourist interest in beauty and scope. The 
200th Anniversary of San Diego, now 
being celebrated here, is fittingly remem- 
bered in the striking new fuchsia hybrid 
which develops rich, variegated Spanish 
colors. ■ 



Frosf Warnings Available 

San Diego County farmers can avail 
themselves of frost warning broadcasts 
through the courtesy of a number of local 
radio stations, James M. Moon, San Diego 
County Agricultural Commissioner an- 
nounced recently. 

Walt Hattman, Meteorologist, U.S. 
Weather Bureau, takes climatic readings 
from several county weather stations, and 
the predicted temperature and dew point 
readings for various county growing areas 
are broadcast daily. 

Forecasts may be heard locally over 
KUDE, Oceanside, 1320 k.c, at 7:10 
p.m.; KOWN, Escondido, 1450 k.c, at 
7:05 p.m.; KOGO, San Diego, 600 k.c, 
at 7:25 p.m.; KARL-FM, Carlsbad, 95.9 
m.g, at 7:10 p.m.; and KMLO, Vista, 
1000 k.c, will give a preliminary forecast 
at 4:40 p.m. 

Broadcasts will start November 15th 
and will continue through February 15, 
1970. This service is provided for the 
San Diego County agricultural industry 
jointly by the United States Weather Bu- 
reau and the San Diego County Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. ■ 



Gather ye rose buds while ye may, 
Old Time is still a-f lying, 
And this same flower, that smiles today 
To-morrow will be dying. 

— Robert Her rick 



GARDEN NOTES 

Many odd and rare plants are difficult 
to find in catalogs. Try growing them 
from seed. The seed exchanges of A.H.S, 
American Rock Garden Soc, American 
Primrose Soc. and North American Lily 
Society offer many unusual seeds. So does 
the Royal Horticultural Society of Eng- 
land. Since germination of many of these 
seeds is often slow, sow out doors as soon 
as received in winter or early spring. Some 
may not come up until well into summer. 
And a few as Hellebores and Viburnums 
may wait over for at least a full year. Be 
patient and use long lasting labels. 

It's fun to have a few plants that puzzle 
most gardeners, a sort of horticultural 
conceit remover. We all get an occasional 
such person in our gardens. Tricyrtis will 
slow down many of them. I find T. hirta 
most showy with its September blooms. 
If it does not germinate the first time try 
sowing some more the following year. 

The old-fashioned mole plant, Euphor- 
bia lathyrus, is another one few recognize. 
It is an evergreen biennial. Try shearing 
it first summer for a low evergreen hedge. 
When allowed to bloom it has a fascinat- 
ing way of coming up in most unex- 
pected places around the garden. Will get 
four feet tall if left alone. 

— Gardeners Forum ■ 



34 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



SAN DIEGO flOUl ASSOCIATION 

FLORAL BUILDING, BALBOA PARK 

232-5762 

(Under the sponsorship of 
The Park and Recreation Dept., City of San Diego) 

Third Tuesday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Donald A. Innis 298-1690 

1827 Puterbaugh St., San Diego 92103 

FLOWER ARRANGERS' GUILD OF SAN DIEGO 

First Thursday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. James Terrell 465-4715 

4433 Summit Drive, La Mesa 92041 
Rep: Mrs. J. Otto Crocker 582-5316 

4749 Redlands Dr. SD 92115 

COORDINATING GROUPS 

SAN DIEGO BOTANICAL GARDEN 
FOUNDATION, Inc. 

Second Thursday, Floral Building 
P.O Box 12162. S. D., Calif. 92112 

Pres.: Mrs. Wm. E. Betts, Jr. 223-7259 

936 El Mac Place, San Diego 92103 

PARTICIPATING GROUPS 

IKEBANA INTERNATIONAL CHAPTER No. 119 

Fourth Wednesday, Floral Bldg. 10:00 a.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. D. J. Arnold 

5377 Mt. Burnham Dr. San Diego 921 1 1 278-5070 
Rep.: Mrs. Roy Jones 222-9737 

39/1 Del Mar Ave., San Diego 92106 

AFFILIATE MEMBERS 1969 

CONVAIR GARDEN CLUB 

First Wednesday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mr. Daniel Blum 
4730 Baylor Drive San Diego 92115 582-2983 

COUNTY CIVIC GARDEN CLUB 

Meets every Thursday, 12m to I p.m. 
Garden House, Grape and 101 Civic Center 

Pres.: Mr. Arnold F. Landweer 295-4704 

3554 Georgia St.. S.D. 92103 
Rep.: Mrs. A. C' Van Zeyl 463-6165 

12254 Wintergardens Dr., Lakeside 92040 

LAS JARDINERAS 

Third Monday, 10 a.m. Homes of members 

Mrs. H. Mark Young 454-5886 

2643 Hidden Valley Rd., La Jolla, Calif. 92037 
MENS GARDEN CLUB OF SAN DIEGO CO. 

Fourth Thursday, Floral Bldg., 7:30 

Pres.: Mr. Ralph Kirchner 224-1092 

1178 14th St., Imperial Beach 92032 
Rep.: Dr. J. W. Troxell 282-9131 

4950 Canterbury Drive, S.D. 921 16 

ORGANIC GARDENING CLUB 

Third Friday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Capt. C. R. Curr 

3515 37th St., S.D. 92105 284-2042 

Rep.: Mrs. Mary Panek 222-5031 

4860 Del Monte Ave. S.D. 92107 
POINT LOMA GARDEN CLUB 
First Friday, Floral Bldg., 10 a.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Dwlght Warner 222-9193 

746 Cordova Street, San Diego 92107 
Rep.: Mrs. M. M. Nohrden 222-7394 

440 San Antonio St., S.D. 92106 
SAN DIEGO BONSAI SOCIETY, INC. 
Second Sunday, Floral Bldg., 1-5 p.m. 

Pres.: Mr. James Hopper 420-8766 

731 Beech Ave. 
Chula Vista, Calif. 92010 
Rep.: Mrs. Ray Hosier 
743 Nautilus St., L.J. 92037 459-6706 

SAN DIEGO CACTUS & SUCCULENT SOCIETY 

First Saturday, Floral Building, 2 p.m. 
Pres.: Walter E. Greenwood 
4085 49th Street San Diego 92105 281-6781 

Rep.: Mrs. Peter Klinefelter 276-6517 

2201 Fairfield Street 
San Diego, Calif. 92110 
SAN DIEGO CAMELLIA SOCIETY 
Second Friday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Mr. Charles Persing 

9552 Larrabee, San Diego 92123 278-1589 

Rep.: Mrs. Deena Montmorency 297-2625 

4349 Florida St., S.D. 92104 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY DAHLIA SOCIETY 

Fourth Tuesday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Victor Kerley 

3765 James Street, San Diego 92106 224-1884 

Rep.: Mrs R. M. Middleton 296-3246 

3944 Centre St.. S.D. 92103 
SD-IMPERIAL COUNTIES IRIS SOCIETY 
Meets 3rd Sunday, Floral Bldg., 2:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Edward Owen 753-7648 

1748 Noma Lane, Leucadia 92024 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY ORCHID SOCIETY 

First Tuesday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 

Pres : Cmdr. John F. Miller 222-2102 

4314 Niagara Ave., San Diego 92107 
Rep.: Mrs. Floy Hyde 463-5203 

4549 Toni Lane, San Diego 92115 

SAN DIEGO FUCHSIA SOCIETY 

Second Monday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Wm. Knotts 
1912 David Street San Diego 921 1 1 277-1188 

Rep.: Mrs. Mildred Murray 753-7756 

467 East Fulvia St. 
Encinitas, Calif. 92024 



SAN DIEGO ROSE SOCIETY 

Third Monday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 

Pres.: Richard D. Streeper 

1333 Wenatchee Ave. 

El Caion, Calif 92021 448-0321 

Rep.: Mrs. Felix White 264-4440 

5282 Imperial Ave.. S.D. 921 14 

SOUTHWESTERN GROUP, JUDGES" COUNCIL 
CALIFORNIA GARDEN CLUBS, INC. 

First Wednesday, Floral Building, 10:30 a.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. R. E. Rosenberg 

3671 Pringle St., S.D. 92110 295-1537 

Rep.: Mrs. Roland S. Hoyt 296-2757 

2271 Ft. Stockton Dr. S.D. 92103 



OTHER GARDEN CLUBS 

ALFRED D. ROBINSON BEGONIA SOCIETY 

Third Friday, Homes of Members, 10 a.m. 

Pres.: Miss Myrle Patterson 224-1572 

4310 Piedmont Dr., S.D. 92107 

BERNARDO BEAUTIFUL & GARDEN CLUB 

First Wednesday, 1:00 Seven Oaks Community 
Center, Bernardo Oaks Dr., Rancho Bernardo 

Pres.: William Wheatley 
16402 Sarape Dr. San Diego 92128 
(Rancho Bernardo) 487-1150 

CARLSBAD GARDEN CLUB 

First Friday, VFW Hall, Carlsbad, 1:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Robert Williamson 729-2276 

1255 Cynthia Lane, Carlsbad 92008 

CHULA VISTA GARDEN CLUB 

Third Wednesday, Chula Vista Woman's Club, 
357 "G" St., 1:00 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Wm. Hedenkamp 422-2978 

515 Second Ave., Chula Vista 92010 

CITY BEAUTIFUL OF SAN DIEGO 

Pres.: Mrs. Raymond E. Smith 488-0830 

4995 Fanuel St., Pacific Beach 92109 

CORONADO FLORAL ASSOCIATION 

Meets 1st Tuesday, Red Cross Bldg., 1113 Adella 
Lane 
Pres.: Thomas J. Gligorea 
309 1st Coronado 92118 435-1007 

CROSS-TOWN GARDEN CLUB 

Third Tuesday, Knights of Columbus Hall, 
3827 43rd St., S.D. 92105, 8 p.m. 

Pres.: Mr. Charles Williams 
3865 41st Street, San Diego 92105 284-2317 

CROWN GARDEN CLUB OF CORONADO 

Fourth Thursday, Red Cross Bldg, 1113 Adella 
Lane, 9:00 a.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. William Marten 435-0926 

761 Country Club Lane, Coronado 92118 

DOS VALLES GARDEN CLUB (PAUMA VLY.) 

Meets 2nd Tuesday, Alt. Pauma Valley and Valley 
Center 1:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Gilbert Hansen 746-5030 

14767 Fruitvale Rd. Valley Center 92082 

EL CAJON WOMAN'S CLUB (Garden Section) 

Pres.: Mrs. John Ohlson 444-2/53 

655 Bradford Rd., El Cajon 92020 

ESCONDIDO GARDEN CLUB 

3rd Friday, Veterans Memorial Hall 1:00 p.m. 

Mrs. Charles Younger 746-5109 

368 Eldorado Drive Escondido 92025 
FALLBROOK GARDEN CLUB 
Last Thursday, Fallbrook Woman's Clubhouse, 
1:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Clair Acker 728-2341 

1061 Riverview Dr. Fallbrook 92028 
V-Pres.: Mrs. Blanche Griset 
769 Knoll Park Lane Fallbrook 92028 728-2394 

GROSSMONT GARDEN CLUB 

Second Monday, 10 a.m. 
8155 University Ave., La Mesa 

Pres.: Mrs. Glendon Orndorff 447-0680 

784 Graves Ave., El Cajon 92020 

HIPS and THORNS 

Meets at Members' Homes Quarterly. 
Pres.: Mrs. Eugene Cooper 295-7938 

IMPERIAL BEACH GARDEN CLUB 

3rd luesday, Imperial Beach Civic Center. 
1:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Waiter V. Roberts 
553 Spruce St., Imperial Beach 92032 

LA JOLLA GARDEN CLUB 

Meets: First Tuesday each month except 
July & August Mt. Soledad Presbyterian Church 
1:00 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. John Marx 459-6417 

1216 La Jolla Rancho Rd., La Jolla 92037 

LAKESIDE GARDEN CLUB 

3rd Monday, Lakeside Farm School, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Lucy May Carender 
9282 Riverview, Lakeside 92040 
LA MESA WOMAN'S CLUB (Garden Section) 
3rd Thursday, La Mesa Women's Club, 1:00 p.m. 
Mrs. L. Fred Will 
8301 Mission Gorge Rd. Sp. 351 
Santee 92071 
LEMON GROVE WOMAN'S CLUB 
(Garden Section) 

First Tuesday, Lemon Grove Woman's Club 
House, I p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Hal Crow 466-3330 

3850 Quarry Rd., La Mesa 



MISSION GARDEN CLUB 

Meets First Tuesday, Asbury Methodist Church, 
4102 Marlborough Ave., S.D. 92116, 8:00 p.m. 
Mrs. Vera Eimar 477-5344 

II29E 16th St., National City 92050 

NORTH COUNTY ROSE SOCIETY 

Meets First Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. at 
Palomar College 
Pres.: James A. Kirk 748-3870 

15131 Espola Road, Poway 

NORTH COUNTY SHADE PLANT CLUB 

Second Sat., 1:30 p.m., Home Federal Bldg., 

Encinitas 
Pres.: Howard M. Voss 
1290 Birmingham Dr., Encinitas 92024 753-5415 

O. C. IT GROW GARDEN CLUB 

Second Wednesday, S. Oceanside School 
Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. John B. Stanton 726-1466 

1858 Avocado Dr., Vista 92083 

PACIFIC BEACH GARDEN CLUB 

Meet second Monday, 7:30 p.m. Community 
Club House, Gresham and Diamond Sts., 
Pacific Beach 

Pres.: Mrs. Edward J. Reemar 488-9609 

970 Agate St., S.D. 92109 

QUAIL GARDENS FOUNDATION, INC. 

230 Quail Garden Drive, Encinitas, Calif. 92024 

Mrs. M. J. von Preissig 286-88 i 8 

5071 55th St. San Diego, Calif 92115 

SAN DIEGO PALM SOCIETY 

Pres.: Mr. James Specht 
PALOMAR CACTUS & SUCCULENT SOCIETY 

Third Saturday, I p.m., Palomar Collage Foreign 
Language Building, Room F22 
Pres.: Mrs. Mildred Gregory 724-4986 

339 S. Melrose Dr., Vista 92083 
PALOMAR ORCHID SOCIETY 
Meets Third Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., Avocado 
Inn, 114 Hillside Terrace, Vista 
Pres.: Eugene A. Casey 753-3571 

932 Crest Drive, Encinitas 
POWAY VALLEY GARDEN CLUB 
2nd Wednesday, 9:30 a.m., Community Church 
Pres.: Mrs. Leo C. Cusick 
1338 Frame Rd Pway 92064 748-8270 

RANCHO SANTE FE GARDEN CLUB 
Second Tuesday — Club House, 2:00 p.m. 
Pres.: Hubert Larson 

P.O. Box 782 Rancho Santa Fe 92067 756-1926 
SAN CARLOS GARDEN CLUB 
Fourth Tuesday, San Carlos Club. 6955 Golfcrest 
Drive 
Pres.: Mrs. Douglas Oldfield 
6372 Lake Levon San Diego 463-0692 

SAN DIEGO BRANCH AMERICAN 
BEGONIA SOCIETY 

Fourth Tuesday, Asbury Methodist Church, 
8:00 p.m. 

4102 Marlborough Ave., San Diego 92116 
Pres.: Mrs. Mary Hofmann 

2327 33rd Street, San Diego 92104 284-4449 

SAN DIEGO BROMELIAD SOCIETY 
Second Monday, 8 p.m. at 4724 Nebo Dr. La Mesa 
Pres.: Mrs. Jackie Hardin 
2626 Coronado Ave., Space 116 
Imperial Beach, Calif 92132 424-3456 

S.D. CHAPTER CALIF. ASS'N NURSERYMEN 
Second and Fourth Thursday, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Mr. Del Johnson 422-5193 

366 Broadway, Chula Vista 92010 

SAN DIEGUITO GARDEN CLUB 

Third Wednesday, Seacoast Savings Building, 
Encinitas, 10 a.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Waldo Vogt 755-4772 

773 Barbara Ave., Solana Beach 92075 
SAN MARCOS GARDEN CLUB 
Pres.: Mr. E, C. Pferdner 
1221 San Julian Dr., San Marcos 92069 744-0226 
SAN MIGUEL BRANCH, AMERICAN 
BiGONIA SOCIETY 
Sscond Wednesday, Porter Hall Clubhouse, 
La Mesa (University & La Mesa Blvd.) 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Mary Birchell 

6070 Sarita St.. La Mesa 92041 466-7631 

SANTA MARIA VALLEY GARDEN CLUB 
Second Monday, Ramona Women's Club House, 
5th and Main, 9:30 a.m. 
Mrs. Troy Reese 789-1334 

Rt. No. I, Box_5l4-H, Ramona 92065 
V-Pres.: Mrs. Winifred Posik 
723 E St. Ramona 92065 789-0531 

SANTEE WOMEN'S CLUB Garden Sec. 
Pres.: Mrs. Leon Roloff 448-0291 

9138 Willow Grove Ave., Santee 92071 
GREEN VALLE GARDEN CLUB, POWAY 
Meets 4th Thursday, 9:30 a.m. Homes of members 
Pres.: Mrs. R. L. Smith 748-0475 

13270 Stone Canyon, Poway 92064 
VISTA GARDEN CLUB 
First Friday, Vista Rec. Center 1:00 p.m. 
Mrs. Gregory Mitchell 724-8875 

245 Yacon Circle, Vista 92083 
VISTA MESA GARDEN CLUB 
Second Tuesday, 2 p.m. Family Association 
Center 
Pres.: Mrs. Clara Haskins 465-0910 

2352 El Prado, Lemon Grove 92045 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 
>an Diego Floral Association 
"loral Building, Balboa Park 
>an Diego, Ca. 92 101 



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